I know I’m biased when I say this, but it’s hard for me to imagine an online course without media. In my opinion, media is one of the best formats for learning. It personalizes courses and gives students options beyond a textbook. YouTube has changed the way our culture learns. For instance, if you want to learn how to assemble Ikea furniture or explore some different cooking recipes, all you have to do is search YouTube and find high quality videos that show you the process step by step.
I often find myself talking with people about online discussions and how to best set them up. Instructors, in particular, want to know the key to student engagement and best practices for their own participation. This isn’t something that has a hard and fast answer – you can certainly find plenty of suggestions, but a lot rides on what’s happening in a particular course.
The Office of Digital Education is preparing to solicit proposals from the schools and colleges of CU Denver and Anschutz Medical Campus for development of new online programs. An important part of the program development grant is the development of courses for online delivery and the professional development opportunities that are available to faculty who are developing and teaching the online courses.
Every semester we host several Canvas Basics trainings for faculty. My baseline goals for faculty attending Canvas Basics are simple: know how to organize your course with Modules, customize your navigation, and seek help using the Canvas Guides and/or the Helpdesk.
Have you ever needed to point out specific information in Canvas or on a website that you use in your online course? If you answered ‘yes,’ then I recommend trying out the university licensed tool Snagit by Techsmith!
If we were to mention “online group work” to you or your students, you may cringe and remember all of the challenges encountered when attempting such a task. You are likely familiar with feedback from students such as:
With Winter Web Camp, it has been a busy week filled with lots of trainings and good conversations with faculty. My favorite day this year was Multimedia Day were Amy Arnold and myself showed off many of the tools that can be used to add multimedia to online courses.
This month we're talking with Susan Laws, a student in the Information and Learning Technologies program here at CU Denver.
For our first post, I’d like to share a bit about our team, our work, and our vision for this space that we hope will become a frequently visited bookmark for you and your colleagues.
OLC Accelerate is an international conference which focuses on improving quality online learning, advancing best practices, and accelerating change in eLearning. The conference attracts academic leaders, educators, administrators, and online learning professionals in higher education and related fields from around the world.

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