This month we're talking with Richard Armstrong, Rick for short, who lives and works in Hawaii, and who is also a University of Colorado Denver student in the MSIS program.
The University Professional & Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) held their Central Region Conference in St. Louis September 26-28, 2018. I was pleased to see that instructional designers held a steady presence throughout the conference. Our role is often misunderstood, so positive exposure on a regional and national level will expand local collaborations with faculty and programs.
As we seek to provide top-notch courses and programs in the online environment, we must remember that the experience of designing and implementing is only half of the equation. On the other side are the students – our partners in education. But we don’t always know much about what online looks like from the student perspective.
Many of the face-to-face classroom design considerations hold true for the online classroom. This third post will explore additional design considerations for active learning online. Once again, the design concepts are organized around the questions of who, what, when, where, and why. The goal is to provide key design concepts to consider before choosing the “right” active learning strategy.
How do you know that utilizing active learning strategies helped your learners achieve not only something, but they achieved something more?
Lecture, as an education design strategy, is familiar and perhaps comfortable to us all. So much so that paradigms exist regarding how to give and receive knowledge and skills.
This blog post is the second in a series about active learning course design. The first post provided an evidence-based perspective on how moving from a lecture paradigm design to an active learning design improves student learning. This second post explores how to design active learning for the face-to-face classroom.
As we seek to provide top-notch courses and programs in the online environment, we must remember that the experience of designing and implementing is only half of the equation. On the other side are the students – our partners in education. But we don’t always know much about what online looks like from the student perspective.
This is the first in a series of posts, intended to provide actionable Canvas strategies that instructors can easily implement to help improve motivation and engagement among online students. Students often feel isolated in online courses, and crave the connection with peers and instructors that occurs more naturally in the face-to-face environment. While students of course have a responsibility to take charge of their own learning strategies, there are certain strategies that you, the instructor, can implement to help students feel more engaged and motivated, and ultimately become more successful in their online learning.
If you’ve been looking for a course to help get yourself ready to teach online, learn more about best practices in digital pedagogy, or dig a little deeper in Canvas features, you’re in luck! Registration is now open for the September section of Online Skills Mastery (OSM, pronounced “awesome”).

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