Due to recent events, many are turning to the platform Zoom Video Communications to virtually communicate. You may have heard the term “Zoombombing.” Zoombombing is when an uninvited attendee crashes your meeting, intending to disrupt and cause problems. There are a few precautions you can take to help prevent Zoomboming in your next meeting.
Last October, members of the Pedagome PLC connected with the creators of DigPINS, a faculty development experience created by Autumm Caines and Sundi Richard that focuses on the growth of digital identity and presence.
One of my favorite tools to tell people about is Adobe Spark. It is an online tool that is completely free (with the option to upgrade some features) and can be used on almost any device as long as you have access to the internet. Adobe Spark starts out by giving you a wide range of templates that can be customized so you can create graphics, videos and webpages. With these templates you can easily change the text, graphics or other elements to make powerful multimedia for your courses.
In the spring of 2018, the Office of Digital Education (formerly CU Online) worked together with faculty member Lois Brink from the College of Architecture and Planning on a collaborative project to bring online students and face-to-face students together in a single classroom. With all the technology options available, the Microsoft Surface Hub reigned supreme and was selected to be the best tool on the market to make this idea a reality.
I know I’m biased when I say this, but it’s hard for me to imagine an online course without media. In my opinion, media is one of the best formats for learning. It personalizes courses and gives students options beyond a textbook. YouTube has changed the way our culture learns. For instance, if you want to learn how to assemble Ikea furniture or explore some different cooking recipes, all you have to do is search YouTube and find high quality videos that show you the process step by step.
Every semester we host several Canvas Basics trainings for faculty. My baseline goals for faculty attending Canvas Basics are simple: know how to organize your course with Modules, customize your navigation, and seek help using the Canvas Guides and/or the Helpdesk.
Have you ever needed to point out specific information in Canvas or on a website that you use in your online course? If you answered ‘yes,’ then I recommend trying out the university licensed tool Snagit by Techsmith!
With Winter Web Camp, it has been a busy week filled with lots of trainings and good conversations with faculty. My favorite day this year was Multimedia Day were Amy Arnold and myself showed off many of the tools that can be used to add multimedia to online courses.
This is the first in a series of posts, intended to provide actionable Canvas strategies that instructors can easily implement to help improve motivation and engagement among online students. Students often feel isolated in online courses, and crave the connection with peers and instructors that occurs more naturally in the face-to-face environment. While students of course have a responsibility to take charge of their own learning strategies, there are certain strategies that you, the instructor, can implement to help students feel more engaged and motivated, and ultimately become more successful in their online learning.