2015 COLTT Presenters

Schedule COLTT 2015, Aug 5 - 6, 2015

Find more COLTT info, customization options, and networking opportunities using the web app: www.coltt.zerista.com

Click PDF icons below to view the Wed and Thurs schedules. Note: print size is legal.
Draft only, changes will be made prior to conference 


COLTT 2015 Wednesday Schedule

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COLTT 2015 Thursday Schedule

Session List 2015

Subject to additions and changes
More on keynote speaker, Michael Feldstein at: www.cu.edu/coltt/2015-keynote-speaker

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Alaina (Feltenberger) Beaver | Student-as-Producer Learning Design: Peer Learning that WORKS!

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Educational Researcher for Division of Continuing Education

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Innovations in Learning, Open Educational Resources (OER)

Learning objective(s): 

Understand why peer-peer education is so hot right now
Understand how student-as-producer learning works as a model for program reform/initiation
Apply principles of new digital literacies to curriculum design

Abstract: The Division of Continuing Education at CU-Boulder explores new models and modes of learning. This session will focus on approaches the Online Credit Program has spearheaded to manifest the ethos of the R1 university in student-as-producer educational opportunities. We will showcase current successes like the Online Composition Hub, a multiliteracy center with synchronous “face-to-face” interactions, and look toward future plans and broader applications for immediate peer-to-peer feedback initiatives.

Bio: Alaina Feltenberger Beaver, PhD, is an educational researcher and pedagogy consultant for the Division of Continuing Education at CU-Boulder. She is the founder of the Online Composition Hub and has conducted professional development on topics related to peer learning.

Geoffrey Rubinstein, PhD, is the Director of Online Learning for the Division of Continuing Education at CU-Boulder. He is a supporter of a variety of in-house projects that promote student-as-producer learning opportunities.

Description: This session will investigate a variety of ways that a learning institution can reframe the conversation to develop students as producers. Our examples will draw from the Online Credit Program at CU-Boulder, which is interested in new modes and models of learning. We will highlight currently successful programs like the Online Composition Hub, a student-staffed multiliteracy center that promotes synchronous “face-to-face” interactions in a digital composing environment. In addition, we will invite our audience to explore with us some broader implications of immediate peer-to-peer feedback which could be adapted to a variety of educational contexts. These conversations draw from a belief that peer collaboration, as built in to learning systems, allows students to remix and claim ownership of knowledge production.

Zacch Becker | Ensuring Academic Integrity with Online Proctoring

Organization: ProctorU

Role: Partnership Representative

Session Type: General Presentation w/polling

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Effective Blended Learning Practices

Learning objective(s):

The differences between identity authentication and attendance verification, 
Ways to develop secure exam structures

Abstract: The presentation will demonstrate how educators may prevent cheating, ensure the academic integrity of distance learning programs, and advance policies designed to reduce incidents of dishonesty online using a number of strategies. The presenter will also share industry research and best practices.

Bio: Zacch Becker is a Partnership Representative at ProctorU, based out of Livermore, California. After attending Las Positas College, he started his career in management with Target. Zacch also spent time with RedBull as an Account Sales Manager. Outside of work, Zacch loves spending time with his family and participating in triathlons. Zacch resides in Livermore, CA with his wife and son.

John Bell/William Cain/Mark Rosenthal | How Telepresence Robots Are Transforming the Classroom

Organization: Michigan State University/Revolve Robotics

Role: CEO (Rosenthal)

Session Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Innovative Presentation Design

Learning Objective(s):

Blended Learning with Telepresence Robots
Classroom setups

Abstract: John Bell and William Cain of the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology doctoral program at Michigan State University (MSU) are working closely with faculty and students to explore and research the use of telepresence robots for learning and instruction.
Join them and Marcus Rosenthal, CEO of Revolve Robotics, for a lively conversation on their research into transforming the classroom. Find out how Kubi and other telepresence robotic devices are used at MSU to create synchronous shared learning experiences between online and F2F students and instructors.
Audience and remote participants will have access to Kubis during the presentation. Contact us at revolverobotics.com/about if you would like to join the conversation, as time permits.

Bio: Marcus Rosenthal is the Co-founder and CEO of Revolve Robotics. Previously Marcus was a co-founder and led the business development for Artificial Muscle that was acquired by Bayer in 2010. Prior to Artificial Muscle, Marcus worked on biologically inspired robots at SRI International.

John Bell is a professor in the Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education department at Michigan State University and the
director of the CEPSE/COE Design Studio. His research interests include abductive teaching and learning with technology as well as synchronous hybrid classes.

William Cain is a doctoral student in the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology program at Michigan State University and a member of the CEPSE/COE Design Studio. His research interests focus on learning and instruction in technology-rich and technology-mediated environments.

[button url="http://RevolveRobotics.com/msu" size="small" target="_blank"]Presentation Materials

Josh Bernhard | Must-Haves in Your Classroom: Qualtrics, ZOOM, and YouTube

Organization: University of Colorado- Denver

Role: Instructor of Business Analytics

Session Type: General Presentation (Seminar Room, capacity 20)

Topic(s): Innovations in Learning, Learning Analytics that Work, Open Educational Resources (OER)

Learning objective(s):

Learn multiple ways to make video lectures using ZOOM
Learn how to use YouTube to present your videos

Abstract: This presentation will discuss how tools external to Canvas (ZOOM, Qualtrics, YouTube, and more) can be integrated into your classroom to create a an environment where your students can follow along with you through the course material. The presentation will discuss the advantages and pitfalls to using these tools. The use of these tools in math intensive courses will be presented. Discussion regarding how we can best meet students' needs with the use of these tools will also be of primary interest.

Bio: Josh Bernhard is an instructor of Business Analytics at the University of Colorado – Denver. He has had experience teaching classes at both the graduate and undergraduate levels in both traditional and online environments. These courses include: introductory statistics, data analysis, decision analysis, and computing for business analytics.

Duane Bird Bear / Markus Pettersson | BAM 2.0: Boosting Aptitude in Mathematics

Organization: University of Colorado- Denver

Role: Physics Professor, University of Colorado- Denver

Session Type: General Presentation (Seminar Room, capacity 20)

Topic(s): Effective Blended Learning Practices, Elements of Engagement, Learning Analytics That Work

Learning objective(s):

Constructivist learning theory
Formative assessment

Abstract: It is important to achieve the right balance between the degree of structure and flexibility that is built into the mathematics learning process. We contend that the more structured the learning environment, the harder it is for the students to construct meaning based on their conceptual understandings. Instead we should structure the learning experience just enough to make sure that the students get clear guidance and parameters within which to achieve the learning objectives, yet the learning experience should be open and free enough to allow for the learners to discover, enjoy, interact, and arrive at their own, socially verified version of truth.

Bio: Duane Bird Bear, Jr: (Physics - University of Colorado Denver) After an exhaustive examination of the current state of mathematical knowledge, he launched a region-wide campaign to improve education in the classroom. He has taught abroad for the last 13 years, focusing on math and physics.

Markus Pettersson: (Math - Nordens Tekniker Institut) A co-developer of the BAM 2.0 theory, he has brought a systematic and Swedish analytic to the research of classroom learning. He has taught math and the natural sciences for the last 9 years.

Aaron Brown | Bottled Lightning: How Online Classes Can Engage and Excite Distance Learners

Organization: DISH Network

Role: Management Trainer-DISH

Session Type: General Presentation w/Q&A

Topic(s): Effective Blended Learning Practices, Elements of Engagements, Innovations in Learning

Learning objective(s):

Learn how added engagement using a live online platform can lead to greater student motivation and success
Learn key best practices for delivering effective live online classes​

Abstract: Live online classes offer a mostly untapped opportunity in the world of higher education to engage distance learners as though they were in class with your star professors. You can also use virtual classrooms to host sessions from renowned experts around the world. Unfortunately, most people haven't figured out how to deliver synchronous online classes in an effective manner. Based on his four years launching a program that completely transformed the way Kaplan Test Prep teaches students preparing for college and graduate school exams, Brown will offer vital insights into when live online classes can deliver real value (and when they can't) and how you can build a program to deliver great classes that delight, inspire, and educate your students.

Bio: Aaron Brown helped create the model Kaplan Test Prep used to deliver live online classes and he designed the training program for its live online teachers. During his tenure, he and his team trained over 700 teachers who taught over 100,000 students using Adobe Connect. Hoping to at least match the quality of the student experience in its 200+ classroom facilities, Kaplan's online teachers performed 10 points better online than onsite. He now trains managers and leaders with DISH Network.

Amanda Burch / Stephanie Spratt / Tobin Mangle | Open Educational Resources in the Curriculum: Leads from the Library

Organization: CU Denver Auraria Library

Role: Learning Spaces Technology Manager

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Open Educational Resources (OER)

Learning objective(s):

Identify the most common content types found in OER repositories.
Recognize the six Creative Commons license types and summarize the usage rights and limitations of each.

Abstract: Open Educational Resources (OER) have become increasingly important in the context of higher education, and libraries are beginning to play a pivotal role in developing and disseminating these resources. In this session, we will highlight various content types that are readily available for adoption and adaptation to suit your specific teaching objectives, discuss the Creative Commons license types as applied to OER, and review several searchable content repositories on the Web that contain openly-licensed teaching materials. We will also briefly discuss OER publishing platforms that you can use to share your own content. Finally, a case study will be presented, highlighting an OER initiative at the Health Sciences Library.

Bio: With experience in faculty support, educational technology, graphic design, and web development, Amanda currently serves as the Learning Spaces Technology Manager for Auraria Library. She leads the direction, programming, curriculum integration, and maintenance of technology-enabled learning spaces throughout the library. Amanda earned her Master of Library and Information Science degree in June 2011 from the University of Denver and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Visual Studies from California College of the Arts.

Roberta Calderaro | Games in the Classroom: The Why, the What, and the How

Organization: Community College of Denver

Role: Adjunct Instructor for Center for Math and Science

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Effective Blended Learning Practices, Elements of Engagement

Learning objective(s): 

Evaluate the reasons why to use such games
Select the proper game based on learning goals

Abstract: Games are a great way to engage students in active learning, but a simple internet search reveals thousands of ways to add this learning strategy to your classroom. So, how do you choose what to do, how to set it up, and, most importantly, why you want to add it?
In this presentation, you will learn why certain games can be an effective strategy to engage students, what types of games are best suited for the learning goals your students need to achieve, and how to adapt and implement such games in your classroom. From card games, to board games, to 2.0 creative tools, participants will leave with a solid plan to implement games in their classroom.

Bio: Roberta Calderaro holds a Master's degree in Instructional and Learning Technologies from the University of Colorado Denver. She has served as an adjunct instructor for the Center for Math and Science in the AAA Department at CCD since the Spring semester of 2012. She uses active learning, games, and technology to create meaningful and engaging activities for her students. She presented on different topics, from flipped classroom to quality in online learning and using technology in the classroom.

Tim Chamillard | Tales from a MOOC, and How It Changed My On-Campus Classes

Organization: University of Colorado- Colorado Springs

Role: Program Director- Bachelor of Innovation

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Effective Blended Learning Practices, Innovations in Learning

Learning objective(s):

An understanding of the logistics of preparing and running a MOOC
Ideas about how MOOC materials can be integrated into on-campus classes

Abstract: This presentation covers a variety of observations about offering a MOOC on Coursera – with plenty of stories to make you laugh and cry! Topics include the work required to develop and deliver a MOOC, how we can measure success, organizing and managing the peer assessment process, surprises along the way, and other observations. Dr. T will also discuss how doing the MOOC changed the way he organizes and runs some of his on-campus classes. There will be plenty of time for questions (and maybe even some answers) throughout the presentation.

Bio: Tim ʺDr. Tʺ Chamillard taught at the US Air Force Academy for 6 years before retiring from the Air Force to join the faculty at UCCS in 2003. He serves as the Program Director for the Bachelor of Innovation™ in Game Design and Development at UCCS, teaches various Game Design and Development courses required for that degree, and researches in the Computer Science Education area. He also offered the first MOOC in UCCS history on Coursera in Fall 2013. Dr. Chamillard spent 5 1/2 years as an indie game developer in a company he formed with his two sons.

Janet Corral / Candace Berardinelli | Teaching, Learning, and Assessment in a Time of Cyborg Learners

Organization: University of Colorado Denver- Anschutz Campus

Role: Director of Evaluation and Research, the Teaching Scholars Program, and Online Learning for Academy of Medical Educators- School of Medicine

Session Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Changing Role of Faculty, Disruptive Innovations, Other

Learning objective(s):

Describe concepts of cognitive prostheses
Critically appraise when, where, and how faculty and student learners both act and do not act as cyborg learners
Identify and discuss how to accommodate cyborg learning, teaching, and assessment in their work

Abstract: Faculty and learners are increasingly accessing knowledge and skills content through online and mobile platforms. Clark and others propose that such relationships with digital media enhance cognition, such that the digital tools function as “deep and integral parts of the problem-solving systems we now identify as human intelligence” (Clark, 2003). Teachers and learners might be cyborgs, whose information technologies act as cognitive prostheses by extending their memory and speed of thinking. The discussion will start with participants sharing their own experiences of cognitive prostheses. The presenters will provide a short (10 min) presentation on the concepts and implications of cyborg teaching, learning, and assessment. In small groups, participants will critically appraise the implications of cognitive prostheses before sharing key discussion points to the larger group.

Bio: Janet Corral is Director of Evaluation and Research, the Teaching Scholars Program, and Online Learning for the Academy of Medical Educators at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. She is also the Education Evaluation Specialist for the Department of Family Medicine, where she guides assessment and evaluation for undergraduate, graduate, and continuing development. Her PhD in Educational Technology focused on the development of expertise in ill-structured domains, and she has won awards for curriculum design, simulation, and educational leadership. Janet's background in education spans K-12, higher education, government, non-profit, and corporate training. She enjoys her service in the national medical education community leading Computing Resources in Medical Education (“CRIME Boss”) for the AAMC WGEA region.

Candace Berardinelli PhD, RN is an Associate Professor and Director of Faculty Development in the University of Colorado College of Nursing. Her teaching responsibilities include teaching online courses in the nursing undergraduate and master's programs. As director of faculty development, a new position in the CON, she has developed and implemented faculty development workshops, a weekly teaching tips listserve, a New Faculty Program, and an online course entitled “Best Practices in Teaching and Learning.” Her research interests are focused on the scholarship of teaching and student learning (SOTL) in nursing education. Her current SOTL project is focused on identifying disciplinary nursing concepts that students consistently fail to grasp or master (bottlenecks). The identification of disciplinary bottlenecks is the first step toward designing courses that effectively deconstruct difficult concepts essential for successful student learning. Dr. Berardinelli earned her BSN at the University of Pittsburgh and both her MS/ANP and PhD in nursing at the University of Colorado College of Nursing.

Andrew Czaplewski | Next Level Grading Rubrics: Automating the Student Feedback Process

Organization: University of Colorado- Colorado Springs

Role: Professor of Marketing and International Business

Session Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Assessments, Elements of Engagement

Learning objective(s):

Learn the importance of student feedback
Understand the problems of standard grading rubrics and the benefits of a technology-assisted rubric
Learn the steps required to automate student feedback

Abstract: Do you grade writing assignments or oral presentations? Have you ever thought to yourself, “They pay me to grade, but I teach for free.”? Do you want to learn how to provide more detailed student feedback in much less time? If you answered yes to any of these, this presentation is for you. Rubrics offer marketing educators numerous advantages, but they give general rather than specific feedback. This presentation describes the benefits and problems of grading rubrics and introduces a technology-assisted solution using some advanced features of Excel that anyone can learn. The main added benefit of a technology-assisted approach is providing more specific student feedback that can be used to improve future work and increase perceptions of grading fairness and course satisfaction.

Bio: Andrew Czaplewski is a Professor of Marketing and International Business at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs (UCCS). Andrew earned his PhD in Marketing from Arizona State University, an MBA in International Management from Thunderbird School of Global Management, and a BS in Business Administration from Northern Arizona University. He has been teaching online MBA courses since 2000 and online undergraduate since 2011. Andrew has been recognized with numerous teaching awards including: The UCCS Outstanding Teacher Award, the UCCS College of Business Online MBA Teaching Award, the UCCS Teaching with Technology Award and multiple UCCS College of Business Teaching Awards.

Cynthia Drake | Notice What You Notice: The Power of Experiential Learning in Online Courses

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: PhD Candidate- English Department

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Effective Blended Learning Practices, Elements of Engagement

Learning objective(s): 

Understand the purpose and value of experiential learning
Refine some general techniques to suit their specific courses
Generate three concrete ideas to enhance the experiential learning in a course

Abstract: How can instructors generate a culture of engagement and collaboration in an online course? This question will be our focus in a session that will be part demonstration, part discussion, and 100% audience participation. We will look at specific strategies to leverage multimodal and experiential learning to bring students fully into the conversation of the course. Session participants will hear five tips to make any online course more experiential and will generate three concrete ideas to use in their courses.

Bio: Cynthia Drake began her career as a teacher in Kyoto over 25 years ago. Since then, she has taught EFL, expository writing, and literature at private schools, community colleges, and universities. She is currently a PhD candidate in the English Department at CU-Boulder, where she is finishing a dissertation on the epistemologies of nonduality migrating from India to England in the early twentieth century. She currently teaches online courses for CU-Boulder as well as first-year seminars focusing on the intersection of contemplative learning and diversity for Naropa University.

Description:Students often report a sense of distance and disconnect from the material in online courses. Instructors, meanwhile, receive work from disembodied beings who “show up” via impersonal assignments but rarely take advantage of synchronous or enrichment learning opportunities. In this interactive presentation, we will look at ways to enhance student learning and engagement through experiential exercises and assignments. We will practice reflective observation of our own curricular goals and work in pairs to brainstorm ideas to try in our courses. All materials will be provided.

Corey Edwards | Any Given Monday: Winning the Student Engagement Game

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Athletics Academic Coordinator

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Digital Learning Environment

Abstract: What can Athletics teach Academics about student engagement? In this session we will examine how athletics staff, administrators and coaches leverage team dynamics to improve student engagement, and how those strategies could inform better design of learning environments. Participants will walk-off with proven principles that will keep a student’s head in the game.

Bio: Corey Edwards currently serves as an Academic Coordinator and the Tutoring Director for the University of Colorado Athletics Department. In additional to his professional responsibilities, he is pursuing a graduate degree in Technology, Media, and Society at the University of Colorado’s ATLAS Institute with a focus on designing learning technologies for NCAA student-athletes. Corey is an alumni of the University of Northern Colorado where he studied Communication & Journalism and received an MS in Sport Administration.

Cherriethel (Cherry) Emerson / Kae Novak | MaxiMania: A Novel Approach to Teaching and Assessing SLOs

Organization: Front Range Community College

Role: Instructional Designer

Session Type: Workshop

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement, Mobile Technology and Devices, Innovation in Learning,

Learning objective(s):

Ability to identify and describe information and technology objectives
Ability to assess students' effective use of technology, to locate, process, and assess information
Ability to synthesize ideas and construct new learning environments to teach information and technology objectives

Abstract: MaxiMania. Participants will actively "play the game" that anthropology students created while working with an instructor and an information and literacy outcome mentor based on the documentary "Maximon - The smoking and drinking saint of Guatemala." The game encouraged creative thinking in real-time research as teams competed in a six-level game. Student facilitators were taught to assess participants’ information and technology literacy skills using the college’s student learning outcomes. Learn how social media and social interaction enhance the learning experience. This framework was F2F but can be adapted to online classes or a single classroom experience. There were over 60 students and instructors participating. While assessment was in progress at the time of this submission, results will be presented at the session.

Bio: Dr. Cherriethel (Cherry) Emerson’s PhD is from CU-Boulder. Her interest in games and game theory is a result of a lifetime interest in game theory. Cherry has worked in diverse occupations such as owning/operating a private prison, administrating high-tech organizations where she implemented game theory based projects. Since 2006, she has focused on education. One of Cherry's well-worn t-shirts reads, "I quit gaming and it was the worst 15 minutes of my life!" This MaxiMania project was developed in cooperation with Kae Novak (FRCC) with whom she has collaborated on many technology in education projects including using War Hammer, Second Life, and other role-playing activities. She also worked with the FRCC GAMES MOOC, again with Kae Novak. Just don't ask her what she thinks of Minecraft!

Kae Novak is an instructional designer for Front Range Community College. She is also an educator and educational technologist who is passionate about learning. She enjoys learning and playing with an exceptional group of fellow educators in ISTE Games & Sims Network, Virtual Environments Network and the educators’ gaming guild, Inevitable Betrayal. She spent 2012 – 2014 working on several immersive and game based learning grants for the Colorado Community College System to include five iterations of the Games MOOC. She has been featured on eCampus News and other publications for her views on games and the future of education.

Description: Participants will be involved in not only reviewing an exemplary project that combined film, food, and technology to teach and assess information and technology objectives. Participants will also see part of the film that was used, look at the rubric used to assess student learning, and actively participate in teams during the session and play the actual game used in the demonstration project.

Michael Erickson / Sam Spiegel | Avoiding the Kobayashi Maru: A Shared Vision for Institutional Transformation

Organization: Colorado School of Mines

Role: Chief Information Officer, Director- Center for Innovative Learning and Teaching

Session Type: Discussion

Topics:Changing Role of Faculty, Disruptive Innovations, Elements of Engagement

Learning Objectives:

Learn about efforts at Mines, and participants’ organizations, to support innovative teaching through active collaboration
Network with others who are striving to support innovative teaching through instructional technology and pedagogical support

Abstract:The Kobayashi Maru is the classic “no win” scenario from StarTrek. Another potential no-win scenario is attempting to balance competing needs and priorities of students, faculty, and information technology services as instruction and instructional technologies continue their evolution. The newly established Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning at Mines is collaborating with central IT to create a common vision and approach to these challenges and identify a winning solution. Like yours, our goal is to advance the quality of students’ learning experiences and support faculty’s use of innovative teaching approaches and technologies. Come learn about our initial efforts and share your experiences through structured problems-of-practice discussions. Together we will reflect on challenges and solutions to take on the Kobayashi Maru at all our institutions.

Bio: Mike Erickson joined Mines as the Chief Information Officer in September 2014, leading the division of Computing, Communications, and Information Technologies; this includes providing support for instructional and educational technology, both within and external to the classroom environment. Prior to joining Mines, he was CIO at Emporia State University in Emporia, KS. He has more than 25 years of experience in bringing information technology to bear in support of students, faculty, and the educational mission of higher education.

Sam Spiegel is Director of the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning at the Colorado School of Mines. He served as Chair of Disciplinary Literacy in Science and as Associate Director of the Engineering Education Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh; Director of Research & Development for a multimedia company; and founding Director of the Center for Integrating Research & Learning (CIRL) at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. CIRL was recognized as one of the leading National Science Foundation Laboratories for activities to promote science, mathematics, and technology (STEM) education. His current efforts focus on innovation of teaching resources and practices.

Courtney Fell / Doris Cheung | How to Get Your LMS to Work for You and Your Students

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Academic Technology Consultant

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement, Innovations in Learning, Innovative Presentation Design

Learning objective(s):

List ways to design a personalized online learning experience
Describe design elements that can enhance learner engagement
Explain how incorporating a variety of learning methods can help motivate learners and increase completion rates

Abstract: Do you feel like you’re bombarding your students with information and are overwhelming them on the first day of class? Is your learning management system holding you back from creating a more engaging and student-centered learning environment? CU-Boulder confronted a wicked design problem when tasked with creating a streamlined, personalized online orientation environment to prepare incoming students for their upcoming academic journey. Come hear how we pushed the limits of our LMS and learn how you can build a responsive learning environment, customize students’ experiences, and motivate students in your own courses. We’ll discuss “What would you like to do in your LMS but can’t?” and then brainstorm solutions. Participants will walk away with new approaches to designing online environments and enhancing students’ learning experiences.

Bio: Courtney Fell is an Academic Technology Consultant for the Office of Information Technology. Courtney first came to CU in 2007 as a Spanish Lecturer and it was through her classes with Continuing Education that she began teaching Spanish in the hybrid format. For three years, she worked at the Anderson Language & Technology Center, leading workshops and consulting with language faculty on the pedagogically sound integration of technology in the language classroom. Courtney is now a proud member of OIT’s Academic Technology Design Team and most recently coordinated the campus effort to move CU’s orientation online.

Doris Cheung has been an Academic Technology Consultant since September 2006 working with faculty to improve learning by blending emerging technologies with innovative teaching methods. She combines her background in adult learning theory, curriculum design, and online learning to motivate learners to be successful. Whether collaborating with subject matter experts or faculty to develop or reenvision learner experiences, Doris loves to hear faculty say, “I’m so excited about this course,” or “I’m feeling empowered!” Her teaching experience includes helping professionals learn how to plan and facilitate learning that makes a difference.

Noah Finkelstein | A Digital Crossroads: Why Vision and Theory are Essential in Educational Transformation

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Professor of Physics

Session Type: Research Presentation

Topic(s): Assessment, Changing Role, Research

Learning objective(s):

A new framing of what education is and a functional definition that folks can use
A construct of how tools (technologies) can support (and inhibit) the goals of educational practices
Awareness of evidence/data

Abstract: With increasing attention to and need for higher education, the promise of digitally mediated education captures the imagination of many. As costs of higher education to individuals rise and as our society increasingly requires advanced education of our citizens, technology mediated learning has been touted as the solution for individuals and for institutions. As we engage, we must consider who we are supporting through these new media. Will technology mediated education address or exacerbate the various achievement gaps between majority and underserved communities? To frame how we might answer this question, the presenter will provide theoretical tools for considering what education is, how technological tools shape education, and ground these with experiments (e.g., MOOCs & computer simulations) designed to study and advance educational access, quality, and impact.

Bio: Noah Finkelstein is a Professor of Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder and conducts research in physics education, specifically studying the conditions that support students’ interests and abilities in physics and developing models of context. He is a PI in the Physics Education Research (PER) group and a director of CU’s Center for STEM Learning. He is involved in education policy serving on many national boards and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a Presidential Teaching Scholar, and the inaugural Timmerhaus Teaching Ambassador for the University of Colorado System

Steve Foster | Engaging Students with Mobile Devices: Introducing Reef Polling by iClicker

Organization:iClicker

Role:Regional Client Represenatative

Session Type:Demonstration

Topic(s): Mobile Technology and Devices

Learning Objective(s):

Learn about REEF Polling by i>clicker, a solution for mobile polling using students' own devices
Understand how to get started using REEF Polling by i>clicker in your courses

Abstract:Have you considered leveraging mobile devices to engage students and gather real time feedback? Interested in expanding in class polling beyond multiple choice? Attend this session to learn how REEF Polling by i>clicker can help. We will explore this new cloud-based solution from the instructor and student perspective in a hands-on, interactive session.

Bio:Steve is the regional client representative for i>clicker. He has been active in consulting and collaborating with educators on improving learning in Higher Education for 25 years.

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Mark Gammon| JourAPPic World: InGen-ious Apps for Work and Life

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Learning Experience Designer

Session Type: Technology Round-up

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Mobile Technology and Devices, Other

Learning Objective(s):

Exposure to innovative tools and apps
Assess if and how these tools might help address challenges we face in work and life
Have fun and get energized about new possibilities. Geek out!

Abstract: The apps will be running wild in this session! Join us for an exciting expedition into the ever-evolving jungle of tech tools. From cute and harmless to burly and formidable, we'll maneuver our way through a wide range of tools, apps, and platforms that might just save your life (not really). No boring museum tour here, this rapid-fire encounter with the latest attractions will keep you on the leading edge of the technology kingdom.

Bio: Mark Gammon is a sociologist, researcher, and educator who is interested in the intersection of people and technology. As a Learning Experience Designer with the Academic Technology Design Team at CU-Boulder he works on strategic campus projects related to technology and education. Between stints in academic technology at CU-Boulder, Mark has worked as a Social Media Manager in the technology sector and recently as a Teaching and Learning Technology Strategist at the University of British Columbia. His interests and research include identity in technologically mediated contexts, social networks, digital media literacy, and the affordances of technology for teaching & learning.

Crystal Gasell / Amy Linville | SOS: Saving Faculty Training

Organization: University of Colorado- Online

Role: Manager of Academic Services

Session Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovation

Learning objective(s):

Participants will discover innovative training approaches and ideas
Participants will compare the pros and cons of various training models
Participants will collaborate on ideas for maximizing faculty professional development

Abstract: Are you looking for an alternative to sit-and-get training for faculty? Faculty development doesn’t have to be terrible; it can be awesome. In Summer of 2014, CU Online piloted a new 10-week, fully online faculty training program. Branded as the Online Skills Mastery (OSM, pronounced “awesome”) program, it prepares online instructors to excel in teaching and reward them for professional development through a badging program. And the learning doesn’t end there! In Phase 2, faculty have the opportunity to continue their learning through a variety of online, self-paced elective courses. Come participate in the ongoing discussion of how to maximize faculty professional development and learn from OSM examples and feedback.

Bio:Crystal Gasell is the Manager of Academic Services at CU Online. Crystal’s primary focus is to expand the training and support programs offered to faculty and students at the University of Colorado Denver. She is currently researching online faculty development and ways to impact course quality as a doctoral student at Boise State University.

Amy Linville is a Course Developer for CU Online and a recent graduate of the Information and Learning Technologies Master's Program at CU Denver. Amy’s primary focus is to assist faculty through online training and development. She is a huge advocate for embracing new educational technologies and finding ways to implement these new concepts into the online classroom.

Christopher Geanious | Beyond the Rocktopus: 3D Printing in the Classroom

Organization: Colorado State University

Role: Instructional Designer

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Maker and Hacker Culture

Learning objective(s):

Participants will learn what Fused Deposition Modelling is
Participants will learn how to find 3D printable files and data sets
Participants will learn how to integrate 3D printing into face-to-face courses

Abstract: Access to 3D printers and 3D printable data has expanded exponentially over the past five years. Fused deposition technology will be explained and shown to be a cost effective method of producing models for student use. This presentation will showcase examples of 3D printed models in use in courses at Colorado State University and describe how inexpensive manipulatives can be produced by nearly anyone with access to a 3D printer. Participants will be shown how to access 3D printable files and data sets.

Bio: Chris Geanious is an Instructional Designer at The Institute for Learning and Teaching (TILT) on the Colorado State University campus. He works primarily on redesigns and enhancements of face to face courses. A large part of these efforts focuses on increasing the use of appropriate technologies in the classroom. One facet of this has been the integration of 3D printed models and manipulatives into course lectures. Chris has worked in higher education for the last 20 years focusing on teaching and learning as well as educational technology.

Nancy Gold | Make Life Easier with D2L's Brightspace-Free Instructor and Student Mobile Apps

Organization: Desire 2 Learn

Role: Denver Account Manager

Session Type:Demonstration

Topic(s): Open Educational Resources

Learning Objective(s):

Discover Brightspace Pulse-D2L's free new student mobile app
Investigate other free Brightspace mobile apps: Assignment Grader, Binder, Mobile Web Access
Get answers to your questions about these tools

Abstract:The world is going mobile; faster than most of us realize. According to Ericsson, 85% of the world population will have a smartphone in four years.
Mobile is central to the Brightspace platform. Users can download content-to-go with Brightspace Binder. Instructors can grade assignments anywhere with Brightspace Assignment Grader. You can access the Brightspace Learning Environment from most mobile devices.
Today’s students find it hard to keep track of all the dates for readings, assignments, and tests across courses. That's why D2L developed Brightspace Pulse, so students are able to stay up-to-date and be prepared for their courses by unifying course calendars, assignments, grades, and news during your student's busiest times.
Come learn how to use these free Brightspace mobile apps!

Bio: Nancy Gold, your D2L Account Manager, is based in the Denver area. With over 20 years of experience working to meet her Higher Education client’s content needs as a national account publishing representative, Nancy was captivated by the possibilities that effectively incorporating online learning technology could bring to students, faculty, and institutions. Seizing an opportunity in 2013, Nancy joined D2L and continues to explore the art of the possible with clients!
William Kearns, a D2L Solution Engineer, has been working with Higher Education and K-12 institutions for the past eight years. William's background encompasses a wide array of industry experience: Information Technology, Finance, Pharmaceutical, Health Care, Federal/State/Local Government, Real-Time Process Control, Telecommunications, and Programming.

John Heisel | Active + Collaborative = Learning: An Online Approach

Organization: Front Range Community College

Role: Faculty Development Coordinator

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Effective Blended Learning Practices, Elements of Engagement

Learning objective(s):

Participants will better understand active and collaborative teaching tools for more engaging and meaningful online classes
To apply the examples presented in this session to their online class for increased student success and engagement
Confidence applying active learning principles to online classes

Abstract: Active learning is when experiences stimulate mental activities that lead to meaningful learning. Collaborative learning is when two or more people learn together. This workshop will present the effectiveness of combining these theories online by utilizing multiple forms of media (transmedia). Examples will be provided and solicited from participants.

Bio: Instructional designer, educator, technology helper… John Heisel has a bachelor’s degree in English and master’s in Educational Media from Appalachian State University in North Carolina. His background includes work as a teacher, graphic designer, web designer, programmer, photographer, and wilderness medicine instructor. Since 2005, he ran a photography business and shot over 200 weddings. His FRCC journey began in 2007 teaching multimedia and graphic eesign courses at the Westminster and Boulder campuses. Also, he is a certified TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language) instructor and former Emergency Medicine Technician. His current job as Faculty Development Coordinator is to develop the program to train faculty with Desire2Learn (D2L) and other forms of instructional design. This includes facilitating the online instructor certification program, managing the Instructional Design Center at BCC, and coordinating online learning workshops college wide. He has presented at conferences across the state including eLCC, CCCOnline's Connect Conference, FRCC's Teaching and Learning with Technology, COLTT 2013 Cafe Pedagogique, and COLTT 2014.

Ryan Higley | Gamification: Why Games are ADDICTIVE and Your Course IS NOT

Organization:

Role: Digital Artist

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Elements of Engagement, Integrating Arts and Technology

Learning objective(s):

How Gamification can help increase engagement in online/hybrid courses
Structural vs. Content gamification
Simple ways to gamify your course.

Abstract: Gamification isn't just for Candy Crush and Four Square. Your course could be taking advantage of the game-mechanic psychology that makes those experiences engaging and addictive. This session offers real world scenarios and practical advice in effectively implementing gamification design into both hybrid and fully online courses. Ryan’s first-hand knowledge in working with educational gamification will help you avoid the pitfalls, embrace the psychology, and learn about the different styles of gamification that can help you motivate anyone.

Bio: Ryan Higley is a digital artist who has worked extensively as an instructional designer, graphic artist, and multi-media designer here in Colorado. He’s also taught courses in web design, animation, graphics and rapid visualization at a University level and hosted many professional development seminars in LMS course design, social media and gamification. An avid video game player since the Atari, Ryan has researched, developed and designed gamified solutions to both fully online and hybrid courses with great success.

Remi Holden | When Transmedia Practices Foster Ecological Pedagogy

Organization: University of Colorado- Denver

Role: Assistant Professor of Information and Learning Technologies- School of Education

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Changing Role of Faculty, Effective Blended Learning Practices, Social Media in Education

Learning objective(s):

Identify strategies for ecological pedagogy that stretch online teaching across multiple platforms and settings
Evaluate affordances and constraints of online environments for creating distributed teaching and learning experiences
Design strategies, settings, and media to situate online teaching and learning beyond the “classroom-as-container”

Abstract: Despite advances in social learning characterized by networks of scholarly and creative expression, learning management systems persist as the primary – and often isolated – location for online teaching and learning. Ecological pedagogy, however, celebrates and draws upon teaching and learning practices that flow across multiple online and hybrid settings. In this design-oriented workshop participants will evaluate how transmedia practices can promote distributed approaches to instruction across settings, inclusive of learning management systems, social networks, blogs, and other open online resources. Working in interest-driven groups, participants will align interdisciplinary curricula and learning goals with interactive media and platforms. Participants will also collaboratively design online teaching strategies that exemplify ecological pedagogy across settings. The workshop will conclude with participants sharing design templates, and identifying questions and future goals.

Bio: Remi Holden is Assistant Professor of Information and Learning Technologies at the University of Colorado Denver School of Education and Human Development. He plays at the intersection of the learning sciences and teacher education, designing and researching how educators learn across multiple settings, practices, and disciplines. Remi has won teaching awards from multiple higher education institutions for his original course designs and digital media pedagogies, and has been featured as a keynote speaker at international and national educational technology conferences. Learn more about Remi’s research, teaching, and design at www.remiholden.com.

Description: To participate meaningfully in this workshop, participants are encouraged to bring personal computers and mobile devices (including tablet computers). The workshop structure will include:

Introduction to facilitator, goals and structure of design-oriented workshop
Case study/model of transmedia practices fostering ecological pedagogy, with participant Q&A
Participants create interest-driven design teams
Design Cycle 1, with goal of identifying professional learning ecology (learning objective #1)
Reporting and rapid feedback cycle 1
Design Cycle 2, with goal of evaluating affordances and constraints of platforms and media (learning objective #2)
Reporting and rapid feedback cycle 2
Design Cycle 3, with goal of designing strategies, settings, and media for ecological pedagogy (learning objective #3)
Reporting and rapid feedback cycle 3
Final reflections, outstanding questions and future design opportunities

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Kent Homchick | Movie Kidnapping: Editing for Use Online and the Classroom: Camtasia for Dummies

Organization: University of Colorado-Denver

Role: Assistant Professor-Production Design

Session Type: Demonstration

Topic(s): Other

Learning Objective(s):

The ease with which novice digital film editors can learn film editing techniques
The ease integrating video from the Internet into online or classroom course lecture material
The ease of making digital media available to students on a web site

Abstract: Professor Homchick will demonstrate the ease of capturing movies from the Internet, editing sound and imagery to your hearts content and then integrating this incredible media into a course lecture or online course presentation. A sample project will be demonstrated from start to finish. Adding captions will be demonstrated, and video as a method to convey complex course material will also be shown.

Bio: Kent Homchick is an Assistant Professor of Production Design at the University of Colorado, Denver. He has extensive experience in a variety of digital tools available to educators that can enhance the teaching experience fort the faculty member. A long time presenter at COLTT, Kent is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University.

Description: Hey folks, here is a dirt cheap, uncomplicated way in which to capture selected video off of the Internet, edit it just the way you want it, including the addition of captions, and then very easily make it available for student viewing and download from the Internet. No techie experience required. The software used in this demonstration will be a Mac and Windows app called Camtasia.

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Aisha Jackson / Edwige Simon | Collaborate, Discuss, Explore, Share: Join our Community of Practice

Organization: University of Colorado-Boulder

Role: Assistant Director- Academic Technology Applications- Office of Information and Technology

Session Type: Discussion (Seminar Room, capacity 20)

Topic(s): Other

Learning Objective(s):

Discuss the need for communities of practice
Discuss how a community of practice might look
Discuss how communities of practice can be sustained

Abstract: Are you involved in supporting faculty in their use of technology? If so, we invite you to participate in this session as we form a community of practice (CoP). A CoP provide members with an opportunity to collaborate with others, discuss problems of practice, explore solutions, capture and share information, and enhance both individual and collective knowledge. During this session we will facilitate a group discussion about the need for this community, what it might look like, and how it might be sustained. This session will endeavor to generate a list of community members, a steering committee, and a team to plan a full-day meeting to kick-off the work of our CoP.

Bio: Aisha Jackson is the Assistant Director of Academic Technology Applications in the OIT at CU Boulder. Her team manages the support and improvement of academic technologies including Desire2Learn, the applications that integrate with it, as well as Qualtrics, iTunes U, Coursera, VoiceThread, and Kaltura. Aisha is a doctoral student specializing in Professional Learning and Technology at CU Denver. She has a master’s degree in Educational Technology and Teacher Education. Aisha’s research interests are in the areas of faculty development, technology integration, and leadership for organizational change.

Edwige Simon runs two Language Technology certification programs at the Anderson Language & Technology Center at CU Boulder. She also conducts regular hands-on workshops and gives presentations for faculty, graduate students and K-12 teachers on technology integration in the classroom. She has consulted for the school of Continuing Education at UCB, and Apex Learning. Edwige recently finished her PhD in Online Learning. Edwige was recently elected Programs Director of the International Association for Language Learning Technology, and launched the FLTmag, a magazine dedicated to technology integration in the foreign language classroom.

Mark Gammon is a sociologist, researcher, and educator who is interested in the intersection of people and technology. As a Learning Experience Designer with the Academic Technology Design Team at CU-Boulder he works on strategic campus projects related to technology and education. Between stints in academic technology at CU-Boulder, Mark has worked as a Social Media Manager in the technology sector and most recently as a Teaching and Learning Technology Strategist at the University of British Columbia. His interests and research areas include identity in technologically mediated contexts, social networks, digital media literacy, and the affordances of technology for teaching & learning.

Aisha Jackson | Selecting Accessible Web-based Learning Tools

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Assistant Director of Academic Technology Applications- Office of Information Technology

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Universal Design for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning objective(s):

Describe issues that poorly designed web-based learning tools cause when being accessed by assistive technologies
List core questions to ask vendors related to the accessibility of their services
Make informed decisions concerning whether to integrate a web-based learning tool into their teaching practice

Abstract: Although there are a plethora of web-based learning tools faculty can select from, not all of them will help students learn. There are a number of reasons for this - from the way the course was designed, to the strategies that were used to integrate the technology. This session will focus on one particular component that can impact student learning - accessibility. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: describe issues that poorly designed web-based learning tools cause when being accessed by assistive technologies, list core questions to ask vendors related to the accessibility of their tools, and make informed decisions when selecting academic technologies.

Bio: Aisha Jackson is the Assistant Director of Academic Technology Applications in the Office of Information Technology at CU-Boulder. Her team manages the day-to-day support, and continual improvement of a number of academic technologies including Desire2Learn, the applications that integrate with it, as well as Qualtrics, iTunes U, Coursera, VoiceThread, and Kaltura. Aisha is currently a doctoral student specializing in Professional Learning and Technology at the University of Colorado Denver. She has a master’s degree in Educational Technology and Teacher Education. Aisha’s research interests are in the areas of faculty development, technology integration, and leadership for organizational change.

Description: Here are the key questions faculty can ask vendors to ensure that they have all of the information they need to make sound decisions concerning the use of a technology.

Are there known accessibility issues with the web-based learning tool?

If so:
What are the workarounds/alternatives?
What is your timeline for addressing the issues?
If not:
Have you done any accessibility testing?
If so, was the accessibility testing conducted by an external organization?
What advice would you give me to ensure that I am using the tool in a way that will make it accessible for all students?

After reviewing their responses, if any of the following are true, reconsider using the web-based learning tool in your course.

There are no workarounds/alternatives for the accessibility issues that exist.
Upon review, you find that the recommended workarounds/alternatives are unreasonable for students.
The issue(s) will not be addressed before the tool will be used by students.
The workarounds/alternatives do not allow you to meet your learning objectives.
They indicate that they have not done accessibility testing, or that it was done internally, by their own staff.

Sherry Jones | Epistemic Game Design for Collaborative Inquiry and Civic Engagement

Organization:Community College of Denver

Role: Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Game Studies Instructor

Session Type: Demonstration

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Innovations in Learning, Integrating Arts and Technology

Learning objective(s):

Learn what epistemic games are, the current trends in epistemic game development, and how epistemic games can enhance education
See the design of The Perspective Game, and understand how its game design implements advanced rhetoric principles
Reflect on the potential application of game-based learning, and The Perspective Game, in any classroom

Abstract: Epistemic games, Applied games, and Serious games are all terms that refer to educational games designed for K-12 and Higher Ed learning. Designing good epistemic games requires an understanding of how to deliver sound pedagogical principles through fun and engaging gameplay. The Perspective Game by GetTheIssues is an example of an epistemic game that implements advanced rhetoric theories. The Perspective Game is a massively multiplayer online game that utilizes card game mechanics to invite citizens to engage in civic participation, while harnessing the power of collective intelligence to address real world issues. Sherry Jones, game designer of GetTheIssues, and Martin Radley, inventor of GetTheIssues, will discuss how The Perspective Game provides fun game mechanics that implement sound pedagogical principles in epistemic game design.

Bio: Sherry Jones is a Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Game Studies instructor, creator of “Rhetoric and Composition: The Persuasive Power of Video Games as Paratexts”, and judge for SIIA 2015 CODiE Awards “Best Game-Based Curriculum Solution” category. She has been featured on: Psychology Of Games as one of 50+ Gaming Academics on Twitter; Good Games Writing for her work in game studies; eCampus News for her views on game-based learning, diversity in gaming, and gamergate; eLearning Industry as one of top 23 Gamification Professionals; Electric Literature for her work in Interactive Fiction (IF); Edwin McRae for her research in narratology

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Sherry Jones | Metagame Book Club: A Community of Gaming Preacademics

Organization:Front Range Community College

Role: Philosophy, Rhteoric, and Game Studies Instructor

Session Type: Research Presentation

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Innovative Presentation Design, Social Media in Education

Learning Objectives:

Understand the differences between game-based learning, gamification (or gamified learning), and game studies.
Learn about how to apply game-based learning and gamification methods, as well as theories from game studies, to enhance teaching
Explore the benefits of cultivating a professional development community using multiple, advanced social media to maintain group

Abstract: The Metagame Book Club is a K-20 organization that offers educators professional development opportunities on game-based learning, gamification (or gamified learning), and game studies. The facilitators offer weekly discussions and live webcasts on open access academic books and articles via Google+ Community, Google Hangout, Youtube, Twitter, Flickr, and more. The goal of the book club is to foster a community of gaming pracademics who will play analog or digital games, design course curriculums with gaming principles, and create analog or digital games to enhance teaching and learning. Sherry Jones, the Game Studies facilitator, and Kae Novak, the Gaming in Education facilitator, will discuss their design principles for the book club, feedback from the participants, and how gaming pracademics will influence the future of education.

Bio: Sherry Jones is a Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Game Studies instructor, creator of “Rhetoric and Composition: The Persuasive Power of Video Games as Paratexts”, and judge for SIIA 2015 CODiE Awards “Best Game-Based Curriculum Solution” category. She has been featured on: Psychology Of Games as one of 50+ Gaming Academics on Twitter; Good Games Writing for her work in game studies; eCampus News for her views on game-based learning, diversity in gaming, and gamergate; eLearning Industry as one of top 23 Gamification Professionals; Electric Literature for her work in Interactive Fiction (IF); Edwin McRae for her research in narratology.

Kae Novak is an instructional designer for Front Range Community College. She is also an educator and educational technologist who is passionate about learning. She enjoys learning and playing with an exceptional group of fellow educators in ISTE Games & Sims Network, Virtual Environments Network and the educators’ gaming guild, Inevitable Betrayal. She spent 2012 – 2014 working on several immersive and game based learning grants for the Colorado Community College System to include five iterations of the Games MOOC. She has been featured on eCampus News and other publications for her views on games and the future of education.

[button url="https://sites.google.com/site/metagamebookclub/" size="small" target="_blank"]Presentation Materials

Michael Kazanjian | No Magic Required: Out-of-lecture Experiences in Your Courses

Organization: University of Colorado- Denver

Role:  Instructional Designer- School of Pharmacy

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement

Learning objective(s):

Audience members will create suggestions on inspiring faculty to embrace new methods of content delivery
Audience members will be able to identify some new lecture-exploding strategies for their instructor toolkits

Abstract: Research has shown that lecture is not the best instructional technique. Yet, in practice, we fall back into lecture mode because it is just so convenient, so comfortable, so familiar. The question we’ll pose: How do we break away from this and embrace an enchanting world that doesn’t revolve around lecture? This discussion will begin by highlighting our last two semesters where a determined effort to convert our faculty produced some bewitching and spellbinding experiences. Whether it required a fundamental shift in the role of the instructor, a startling new technique like Just-in-Time-Teaching, or a simple twist on the current lecture format, we would love to hear your stories and brainstorm better ways to deliver content.

Bio: Michael Kazanjian has worked as one of two instructional designers for the online Distance Degrees & Programs at the CU Denver School of Pharmacy since 2013. For this online program he provides pedagogical training and technology aid for both faculty and outside instructors. Course coordination and program support also fall under his purview. A lifelong student, he earned his PhD in French from Emory University in 2010 and is currently finishing his MA in CU Denver’s Information and Learning Technologies program. His latest interests involve relearning everything he has forgotten and proselytizing for the mnemonic troika of Dropbox, OneNote and KeePass.

Lisha Bustos works as an Instructional Designer for the online Distance Degrees & Programs at the School of Pharmacy, CU Denver. For this online program she provides pedagogical training and technology aid for faculty. Course coordination and program support also fall under her purview. After receiving her MA in Education from Adams State in 2010 she taught middle school humanities and college prep courses at Adams State. Her experiences in the classroom proved to be an invaluable resource when she returned to Adams State as an Instructional Designer. Recent projects include the implementation of Zoom (web conferencing) and Proctorio (online proctoring).

Description: Icebreaker: Each audience member has 5 sticky notes, each one worth 10 minutes. There are 3 posters that are labelled Absorb, Do and Connect (respectively). Participants will place their sticky notes as time allotments on the posters to indicate how they typically divide up a 50 minute “class” period.

Susan Kelmer | Is that PDF Accessible? How to Know and Fix it if it Isn't

Organization:University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Alternate Format Access Coordinator- Disability Services Office

Session Type: Hands-on Workshop

Topic(s): Digital Texts, Universal Design for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning objective(s):

Participants will understand what an "accessible document" is and why it is important
Participants will be able to remediate their own scanned or downloaded PDF documents using Adobe's on-board tools

Abstract: Participants will look at several PDF documents, then learn how to make them accessible for persons with print disabilities. Several easy techniques will be demonstrated, and participants will be able to try those techniques on practice documents. Participants will leave the session knowing the latest in best practices for the universal design of PDF documents and PDF scans, and will have the knowledge and confidence to create accessible documents as a matter of routine, rather than as a matter of retrofit.

Bio: Susan Kelmer is the Alternate Format Access Coordinator for the Disability Services office at the University of Colorado Boulder. She has worked in the field of alternate format production for more than fifteen years. She has presented about document accessibility at past COLTT conferences, as well as the annual Accessing Higher Ground conference held in Westminster each fall. Susan and her Assistive Technology Lab staff produce hundreds of accessible documents for students with print disabilities each semester.

Description: Participants will need access to laptops running Adobe Acrobat Professional (v. 10 or 11). Participants can use their own laptops if they have them. Download links for trial versions of Adobe Acrobat Professional will be provided for participants using their own laptops.
Timeline of events:
Introduction/Making sure everyone has a working laptop and is ready to work (5 min)
Explanation of what makes a document accessible and why it is important for a document to be accessible (5 min)
Demonstration of a well-structured, accessible PDF document (5 min)
Demonstration of built-in tools we will be using in Adobe Acrobat to make a document accessible (5 min)
Hands-on, instructor-led application of the tools to various parts of the demonstration document (20 minutes)
Questions and Answers/Closeout (10 min)

Susan Kelmer | Is that PowerPoint Presentation Accessible? How to Know and Fix it if it Isn't

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Alternate Format Access Coordinator- Disability Services Office

Session Type: Hands-on Workshop

Topic(s): Digital Texts, Universal Design for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning Objective(s)

Participants will understand what an "accessible document" is and why it is important
Participants will be able to remediate their own PowerPoint presentations, and create accessible ones for the future
​Participants will be able to remediate, and create from scratch, an accessible Microsoft Word document

Abstract: Participants will look at several PowerPoint presentations, then learn how to make them accessible for persons with print disabilities. Several easy techniques will be demonstrated, and participants will be able to try those techniques on practice documents. Participants will leave the session knowing the latest in best practices for the universal design of PowerPoint presentations, and will have the knowledge and confidence to create accessible documents as a matter of routine, rather than as a matter of retrofit.

Bio: Susan Kelmer is the Alternate Format Access Coordinator for the Disability Services office at the University of Colorado Boulder. She has worked in the field of alternate format production for more than fifteen years. She has presented about document accessibility at past COLTT conferences, as well as the annual Accessing Higher Ground conference held in Westminster each fall. Susan and her Assistive Technology Lab staff produce hundreds of accessible documents for students with print disabilities each semester.

Description: Participants will need access to laptops running Adobe Acrobat Professional (v. 10 or 11). Participants can use their own laptops if they have them. Download links for trial versions of Adobe Acrobat Professional will be provided for participants using their own laptops.
Timeline of events:
Introduction/Making sure everyone has a working laptop and is ready to work (5 min)
Explanation of what makes a document accessible and why it is important for a document to be accessible (5 min)
Demonstration of a well-structured, accessible PowerPoint presentation (5 min)
Demonstration of built-in tools we will be using in PowerPoint to make a document accessible (5 min)
Hands-on, instructor-led application of the tools to various parts of the demonstration document (20 minutes)
Questions and Answers/Closeout (10 min)

Susan Kelmer | Is that Word Document Accessible? How to Know and Fix it if it Isn't

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role:Alternate Format Access Coordinator- Disability Services Office

Session Type:Hands-on Workshop

Topic(s):Digital Texts, Universal Design for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning objective(s):

Participants will understand what an "accessible document" is and why it is important
Participants will be able to produce their own accessible documents using the easy-to-use built-in tools in Microsoft Word.

Abstract:Participants will look at Microsoft Word documents, then learn how to make them accessible for persons with print disabilities. Several easy techniques will be demonstrated, and participants will be able to try those techniques on practice documents. Participants will leave the session knowing the latest in best practices for the universal design of Microsoft Word documents, and will have the knowledge and confidence to create accessible documents as a matter of routine, rather than as a matter of retrofit.

Bio: Susan Kelmer is the Alternate Format Access Coordinator for the Disability Services office at the University of Colorado Boulder. She has worked in the field of alternate format production for more than fifteen years. She has presented about document accessibility at past COLTT conferences, as well as the annual Accessing Higher Ground conference held in Westminster each fall. Susan and her Assistive Technology Lab staff produce hundreds of accessible documents for students with print disabilities each semester.

Description: Participants will need access to laptops running Microsoft Word. Participants can use their own laptops if they have them.
Timeline of events:
Introduction/Making sure everyone has a working laptop and is ready to work (5 min)
Explanation of what makes a document accessible and why it is important for a document to be accessible (5 min)
Demonstration of a well-structured, accessible Microsoft word document (5 min)
Demonstration of built-in tools we will be using in Microsoft Word to make a document accessible (5 min)
Hands-on, instructor-led application of the tools to various parts of the demonstration document (20 minutes)
Questions and Answers/Closeout (10 min)

Deborah Keyek-Franssen | Shark Tank: Come on in, the Water's Fine!

Organization: University of Colorado- System

Role: Associate Vice President- Digital Education and Engagement

Session Type: Debate Panel

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations

Learning Objective(s):

Attendees will be able to identify and describe disruptive innovations in higher education
Attendees will be able to debate pros and cons of disruptive innovations in higher education

Abstract: Join in some fun debate as we (Jacie and Deb) pitch ideas to challenge long-standing notions about education and you help the sharks (a panel of educational technology and higher education professionals) evaluate our presentations live. As the debate draws to a close, you’ll decide which of the ideas should be funded. Harpoons strongly discouraged, shark costumes optional.

Bio: Jacie Moriyama is an educator, technologist, and consultant. She has worked in the area of Faculty Development and Educational Technology for the past 16 years. Jacie is a part of the Teaching and Learning Team for ASSETT (Arts and Science Support of Education Through Technology) at CU-Boulder.

Deborah Keyek-Franssen, higher education devotee, and associate vice president for digital education and engagement, gets to work with colleagues across the CU System on MOOCs, state authorization, teaching and learning with technology, and her favorite conference ever (that would be COLTT!).

Doug Kinney | Why Should We Incorporate Active Learning?

Organization:Echo 360

Role:Regional Sales Manager

Session  Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Effective Blended Learning Practices, Elements of Engagement

Learning Objective(s):

Learn how to gauge student learning in real time
Learn how to promote peer-to-peer learning before, during and after class
Learn how to use the classroom activity data to help at-risk students

Abstract:During this session, participants will learn about the new Active Learning Platform that integrates Lecture capture with student response to gauge learning in real time. Notes, questions and activities are all synched contextually with the classroom experience so students can easily review material on any device. Ultimately the new Echo360 platform improves students success, which improves graduation rates.

Bio:Doug Kinney is the Regional Sales Manager for Echo 360 where he focuses on developing partnerships with Universities and Colleges in the Mtn West. Doug is responsible for working with campus leadership to help implement strategies to improve graduation and retention rates. Previously, Doug was a Sr. Strategic Account Manager for Blackboard working with the largest partners institutions to implement Blackboard solutions. Doug began his career in educational technology managing all the K-12 business with eCollege/Pearson starting in 2006.

Dr. Donna Jones is a Senior Pedagogical Solutions Engineer at Echo360 where she focuses on helping institutions implement and improve their teaching and learning environments with a focus on pedagogy and active learning. Prior to this, Dr. Jones spent nearly seven years with Blackboard, where she also focused on pedagogy and outcomes assessment as both a Sr. Pedagogical Solutions Engineer and Sr. Strategic Consultant. Dr. Jones came from academia, where she has designed, developed, assessed, and taught online courses since 1998. Donna has developed and managed new academic programs, participated in accreditation planning, and created and managed an emerging technology center responsible for investigating and teaching with promising new technologies. She has worked with other institutions to develop distance learning consortium and has been a consultant to the Iowa Communications Network to improve distance learning opportunities in her home state of Iowa. Dr. Jones has many years of experience outside of education including directing an education department for a large health agency, designing and developing business and software education, as well as training and consulting. Dr. Jones is a past president and board member of the Iowa Distance Learning Association (IDLA), the first state chapter of the United States Distance Learning Associations (USDLA). Jones has earned a doctorate of education in Instructional Technology and Distance Education from Nova Southeastern University and her dissertation focused on assessing virtual team building and improved collaboration through problem-based learning in the distance environment.

Ken Knox | The Clicking Point: Utilizing Student Response Systems for Greater Student Engagement

Organization: Eastern Gateway Community College

Role: Assistant Professor and Program Director- Business Management

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Assessment, Elements of Engagement

Learning Objective(s):

Using Clickers for Engagement
Creating Meaningful Clicker Questions
Using Clickers for Assessment

Abstract: This presentation will introduce participants to the various uses of student response technology within the classroom. Though the primary use is student engagement, clickers can be also be used for assessment purposes. The participants will experience a hands-on, real-time simulation so that they can draw their own conclusions regarding the technology. Participants will also become aware of the ease with which to implement an instructional strategy including clickers. Presented in a lively and interactive manner, the participants will learn and develop effective strategies to eliminate the "death by PowerPoint" syndrome while simultaneously getting the students' minds off social media and into the classroom! (This presentation is sponsored by Turning Technologies)

Bio: Ken Knox has been an assistant professor and program director for the Business Management program at Eastern Gateway Community College since 2005.
Eager to embrace innovative academic strategies, Ken earned his masters degree in a cohort-based accelerated program and earned his doctorate in a fully online environment. He has brought this early adopter attitude to Eastern Gateway by embracing classroom technologies such as “smartboards” and “clickers”. He is a member of Turning Technologies’ panel of distinguished educators. Additionally, he was a member of the steering committee that moved the College to the Blackboard learning platform. He has participated in Quality Matters online professional development and continues to take the lead in bringing community college educational opportunities to all students.

Rok Kopp | Using Top Hat to Promote Student Engagement

Organization: Top Hat

Role: Vice President- Enterprise Sales

Session Type: Demonstration

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement, Mobile Technology and Devices

Learning Objective(s):

Learn about the benefits of using mobile technology in the classroom
Understand how Top Hat can be used to facilitate an interactive lecture experience

Abstract: Top Hat is a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) student engagement tool used to ask questions and facilitate discussions with students. Top Hat specializes in increasing student performance through lecture engagement and saving professors time on administrative tasks. Top Hat is being used by 500,000 students in over 400 universities including Colorado State and the University of Denver. Please join us in a session as Top Hat demonstrates their product and describe its possibilities.

Bio: Rok is the Vice President, Enterprise Sales at Top Hat. Rok has been with Top Hat for 3 years and enjoys seeing the impact of technology on the classroom. Top Hat is being used by over 2,000 faculty members and 500,000 students in North America.

Scott Kupferman | 21 Tips and Tools for Making Your Course Accessible to Students with Disabilities

Organization: University of Colorado- Colorado Springs

Role: Assistant Professor- Department of Teaching and Learning

Session Type: Demonstration

Topic(s): Universal Design for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning objective(s):

Attendees will understand accessibility requirements, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 508
Attendees will understand 21 tips and tools for making their courses accessible to students with disabilities
Attendees will understand how the universal design for learning framework may be used as a proactive means of ensuring access.

Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to share 21 tips and tools for making courses accessible to students with disabilities. The presentation will begin with an overview of accessibility, including the requirements set forth by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Next, the presenter will demonstrate 21 tips and tools that instructors can use to meet and exceed accessibility requirements. Examples of these tips and tools include a presenter-developed automated video captioning tool, an accessibility toolbar for course management systems (i.e. Blackboard, Canvas, and Desire2Learn), and a quick-and-easy alternative text generator for powerpoint. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of universal design for learning (UDL) as a proactive means of ensuring access for all students.

Bio: Scott Kupferman, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. He also directors the National Collaborative for Disability and Technology. Dr. Kupferman's research interests revolve around technology for people with disabilities and universal design. He has served as principal investigator, co-principal investigator, and/or grant writer for over 4 million dollars in grant funding. Dr. Kupferman's research and other scholarly efforts have led to various honors, including selection as a National Council on Disability delegate and recipient of the U.S. Department of Education's Commissioner's Award for Excellence.

Joseph Labrecque | Mobile Application Development Technology Roundup: What Works and What Doesn't!

Organization: University of Denver

Role: Senior Interactive Software Engineer

Session Type: Technology Round-up

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Mobile Technology and Devices, Research

Learning objective(s):

Explore current choices in cross-platform mobile development
Be aware of the current landscape and what may lie down the road

Abstract: So many choices! With many schools opting for a BYOD approach to mobile learning, what is the best technology to build upon which can target all the major mobile devices? This session will present a solid rundown of a number of cross-platform mobile application development technologies to give you a leg up on expectations and application. Which technology is best??? Not the most simple question to answer but here is some information that can help!

Bio: Joseph Labrecque is primarily employed by the University of Denver as a senior interactive software engineer specializing in the creation of expressive desktop, web, and mobile solutions. His work incorporates a strong focus on the Adobe Flash Platform alongside more general web standards initiatives involving the use of HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and related technologies. He is also the proprietor of Fractured Vision Media, LLC; a digital media production company, technical consultancy, and distribution vehicle for a variety of creative works. Joseph authors video courses and written works through organizations which include Lynda.com, Peachpit Press, Packt Publishing, O'Reilly Media, Adobe Press, and video2brain. He speaks regularly at conferences such as Adobe MAX, FITC, 360|Flex/Stack, and for a variety of local community groups.

Joseph is an Adobe Education Leader and Adobe Community Professional. He received the Adobe Education Impact Award in 2010 and currently serves on the AEL Advisory Board.

Michael Lightner (Moderator) / David Chatham / Suzanne Nelson / Michael Kazanjian | Academic Honesty: Experience from the Ethical Trenches

Organization: CU System / Colorado Community College System / CU-Boulder / CU Denver | Anschutz 

Role: Multiple, see bios

Session Type: Debate Panel

Topic(s): Assessments, Other

Learning Objective(s):

Abstract: David Chatham has been involved in gathering information on students cheating online and committing financial aid fraud for the last five years. He will report on methods and technology for issuing SARs (Suspicious Activity Reports) how to use data to investigate suspicious activities at a system level, separate from faculty referrals to departments or campus administration. Michael Kazanjian at the CU Denver School of Pharmacy uses the online proctoring service Proctorio as a preventative and watchful eye to create such an environment in both a classroom and admissions setting. Michael will bring his knowledge of LMS integration and installation, student experience, instructor/administration use, their assessment review process, and how online proctoring “fits” into our vision of academic integrity to the debate. Dr. Suzanne Nelson collaborated with CU-Boulder’s Office of Information Technology on a 400-student, multi-stage pilot of in-class online exams using Desire2Learn and various approaches to exam security. She will be ready to discuss the logistics of exam organization, academic integrity considerations, faculty and student feedback, and offer tips on how to implement in-class online exams.

Bio: David Chatham was the Dean of Academic Technology from 2002-2015 at CCCS, where he managed vendor relations for online systems for CCCS colleges, supervised academic technology, and oversaw departments providing course design/development and online library services. Prior to that, David was the Director of Distance Education and Instructional Design at Front Range Community College, Larimer Campus. from 1998-2002, and the Director of Distance Education at Georgia Institute of Technology from 1986-1998.

Michael Kazanjian has worked as one of two instructional designers for the online Distance Degrees & Programs at the CU Denver School of Pharmacy since 2013. For this online program he provides pedagogical training and technology aid for both faculty and outside instructors. Course coordination and program support also fall under his purview. A lifelong student, he earned his PhD in French from Emory University in 2010 and is currently finishing his MA in CU Denver’s Information and Learning Technologies program. His latest interests involve relearning everything he has forgotten and proselytizing for the mnemonic troika of Dropbox, OneNote and KeePass.

Dr. Suzanne Nelson is a Nutrition and Biology instructor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She currently teaches over 975 students a year. She got her Ph.D. In Biology, and a M.A in Science Education. She started developing E-exams with the OIT department at CU-Boulder after being distressed at the amount of paper used for each exam, and the energy used to produce them. She has been successfully using E-exams in her large 400-person nutrition classes for over 3 years now. Dr. Nelson also has taught several classes online for both CU-Boulder and Denver University.

Jennifer Linder-VanBerschot | BOOM! Mind=Blown: A 21st Century Approach to Action Research

Organization: Skillstore

Role: Curriculum Manger

Session Type: Research Presentation

Topic(s): Research, Other

Learning objective(s):

Provide examples on how action research is enhanced by technology
Examine several innovative technology tools
Generate a plan to adopt action research to investigate the impact of new technology tools in their work environment

Abstract: In this interactive session, participants will be inspired to respond to their own burning questions related to the adoption of new technology and tools. Presented in three parts, this session will start with a brief overview of action research, exploring how technology can bring research to life. Next we will offer a technology toolbox for educators where participants will have the opportunity to learn about 6 technology tools for data collection. This session will end with a challenge to investigate and discover the impact of new technology in education.

Bio: Jennifer Linder-VanBerschot, PhD, (Jenna) is the Curriculum Manager for Skillstore, a start-up company offering scenario-based soft-skills training through a mobile application. She also works at University of Colorado Denver, teaching a graduate action research course and a course for faculty on how to teach online. Jenna is interested in the use of online learning to promote interaction across cultures and between international learning communities. She has also conducted evaluation and educational research on the topics of leadership, transfer of training, English language learners, instructional design, and classroom instruction.

William T. Kendal (The Bearded Skeptic) brings 12 years of professional experience in adult education, media design, digital identity, and skepticism, including 10 years working on a grant, Teaching with Primary Sources, for the Library of Congress. Through his work with this preeminent institution, he was led to a love for inquiry-driven skepticism and education, along with a mess of other dabblings including, cosmology, astro & quantum physics, bio & nanotechnology, and anything else that elicits orgasmic philosophical revelations.

Victoria Villescas recently graduated with her second Masters in Information Technology and eLearning Design from University of Colorado Denver. She is a Technology Coach for Ridgeview Elementary in Colorado Springs. She also teaches Integrated Projects and Digital Studies, a 1-1 iPad class, to students K-5. Her 15 years of teaching experience range from Professional Development Courses to Elementary Education. Among her accolades her favorite is the official title of “Supreme Techno Ninja.” (A name given to her by her coworkers.) Drop by her site at www.mrsv.me or email her at vvillescas@d49.org.

Description: The presentation will be organized in three parts.
(1) We will use the Socrative tool as we offer an overview of action research and describe how technology can bring research to life.
(2) We will share six different tools that can be used in an effort to collect data in response to burning questions.
- All Platforms: Socrative and Google Forms
- Tablets and Mobile Devices: Explain Everything & Plickers
- Multimedia: YouTube and Audacity
(3) We will use Google forms as we offer examples of data collection in the k12 and adult education contexts.

Erica Liszewski | Teaching Coding as Art

Organization: University of Denver, Arapahoe Community College

Role: Adjunct Instructor

Session Type: General Presentation (Seminar Room, capacity 20)

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement, Innovations in Learning, Integrating Arts and Technology

Learning objective(s):

Investigate coding as a creative endeavor
Examine pedagogical support for teaching coding as art
Explore strategies for teaching coding as art

Abstract: Coding is a logical, rational, right-brained activity. Art is a creative, abstract, left-brained activity. Surely combining the two is a recipe for disaster, right? Wrong. There’s no truth at all to the idea that a person cannot be good at both coding and art. In fact, creating art is a useful way to teach coding. In this sessions we’ll talk about our experiences teaching coding as a creative process, provide some support as to why this works, and offer some suggestions for teaching coding as art.

Bio: Erica Liszewski is an adjunct instructor at the University of Denver and Arapahoe Community College. She teaches basic programming to students who don't plan to pursue a Computer Science degree as well as courses in game and web development. Erica is one of those not-so-rare individuals who enjoys both art and science and was interested in the overlap between technology and art long before it was trendy.

[button url="https://docs.google.com/document/d/118cbsp-cbIenPkysOIpQTczOYfX5jx-hemP-..." size="small" target="_blank"]Presentation Materials

Jeff Loats | Just-in-Time Teaching - A 21st Century Teaching Technique

Organization: Metropolitan State of Denver

Role: Associate Professor of Physics

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Assessment, Changing Role of Faculty, Effective Blend Learning Practices

Learning Objective(s):

Define Just-in-Time Teaching 
Explain How JiTT improves learning and affective outcomes
Incorporate JiTT into teaching

Abstract: Technology can offer efficient ways do what we have always done, but sometimes it offers a fundamentally new way for instructors, students, and content to interact. Just in Time Teaching (JiTT) is an effective, evidence-based technique for face-to-face courses that creates fast, effective feedback loops. This session covers what JiTT is, why it works and how it can be incorporated into your classes. A second COLTT session, Just-in-Time Teaching: Making It Shine, will address practical concerns, best practices, and a plan for getting started.  JiTT can increase the quality and quantity of contact between students and instructors and deserves your consideration.

Bio:Dr. Jeff Loats, Associate Professor of Physics at MSU Denver, is passionate about evidence-based teaching and learning. He has won multiple teaching awards and has presented about teaching and technology to a wide variety of audiences. Along with several presentations at pas COLTT Conferences, he was the Keynote Speaker at the 2014 Teacher-Scholar Forum at MSU Denver and was a Featured Speaker at the Lilly West Conference on College and University Teaching in March 2012. During the last three years Jeff has helped dozens of faculty adopt evidence-based teaching techniques through a variety of programs, initiatives, workshops.

[button url="http://www.slideshare.net/jeffloats" size="small" target="_blank"]Presentation Materials

Jeff Loats | Just-in-Time Teaching - Making it Shine

Organization: Metropolitan State of Denver

Role: Associate Professor of Physics

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Assessment, Changing Role of Faculty, Effective Blend Learning Practices

Learning objective(s):

Identify tools that  work best for implementing JiTT
List strategies to get student buy-in when using JiTT
​Differentiate which parts of JiTT are really needed from the start, and which are icing to be added later

Abstract: Considering incorporating Just-in-Time Teaching into your courses? You should be! This session will focus on the practical concerns of implementing JiTT: How do you get student buy-in? What are the best-practices? What is a good "starter plan" for your first time implementing JiTT? An earlier session on JiTT will lay the groundwork for this discussion, but a quick refresher on the basics will be presented at the start of this second session.

JiTT can increase the quality and quantity of contact between students and instructors and deserves your consideration.

Bio: Dr. Jeff Loats, Associate Professor of Physics at MSU Denver, is passionate about evidence-based teaching and learning. He has won multiple teaching awards and has presented about teaching and technology to a wide variety of audiences. Along with several presentations at pas COLTT Conferences, he was the Keynote Speaker at the 2014 Teacher-Scholar Forum at MSU Denver and was a Featured Speaker at the Lilly West Conference on College and University Teaching in March 2012. During the last three years Jeff has helped dozens of faculty adopt evidence-based teaching techniques through a variety of programs, initiatives, workshops.

[button url="http://www.slideshare.net/jeffloats" size="small" target="_blank"]Presentation Materials

Chris Luchs | Where Does 21st Century Skills End and Cheating Begin?

Organization: Colorado Community College- Online

Role: Associate Dean for Career and Technical Education- CCCOnline

Session Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Assessment, Changing Role of Faculty, Maker and Hacker Culture

Learning objective(s):

Identify 21st Century Skills and similar educational standards and discuss the gray areas when promoting 21st Century Skills
Discuss how students are using coding, gaming and modding
Discuss how to shape traditional, hybrid, and online courses to support 21st Century Skills and maintain student work integrity

Abstract: In a world pushing educators to prepare students to be creative, collaborative, and interdisciplinary in their approach to technology and online, how do we ensure the integrity of student work and navigate derivative works? Are we using 20th century lenses to do this? Our students regularly mod, code and collaborate online outside of the classroom in ways our code of conducts may consider cheating. They create videos, Machinima, write fan fiction and code. When is student work derivative and when is it plagiarism? This presentation seeks to answer some of the questions that arise when educators look to engage student creativity, but still ensure mastery of core competencies and learning outcomes. Join us to share your experiences as we discuss how to resolve these issues.

Bio: Chris Luchs is the Associate Dean for Career and Technical Education at CCCOnline. He has over eight years of experience teaching online and f2f at the community college level. His areas of instruction are Business, Accounting, and Multimedia and Graphic Design. In addition to formal college instruction, Chris has a passion for investigating new technologies and collaborating internationally with other educators on evaluating and exploring virtual worlds and games based educational applications. His current happy places are analytics, data visualization tools, and World of Warcraft.

Kae Novak is an Instructional Designer for Student Engagement and Assessment at Front Range Community College where she is the online outcome mentor for Information and Technology Literacy at the college. She is also the chair of the ISTE Games and Simulations Network and one of the facilitators of the Metagame Book Club, bit.ly/metagamebookclubsite.

[button url="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pX_YaDUYoxxXQaxX24c4C23tsAjwqcuMjR7t..." size="small" target="_blank"]Presentation Materials

Kara Lukin | A Chimp and a Mule Walk Into a Classroom: Driving and Analyzing Engagement

Organization:Western Governors University

Role: Course Mentor

Session Type: Hands-on Workshop

Topic(s):Changing Role of Faculty, Effective Blended Learning Practices, Learning Analytics that Work

Learning Objective(s):

Install FormMule on a Google form and use it to send an automated confirmation email
Create an email template in MailChimp and use it to schedule an automatic email to a list
Use MailChimp analytics to monitor engagement by student, by resource, or by email

Abstract:No matter how large your enrollments are, no matter whether you teach online or in the classroom (or both), getting students engaged is key. But how can you monitor that engagement? How do you know whether students are actually using those fantastic resources you put together for them? How can you identify students who are interested in specific activities or events and students who may be struggling? In this session, you’ll learn how to use three free online tools--Google forms, FormMule, and MailChimp--to more efficiently register students for, schedule and send materials for, and monitor engagement in workshops, short courses, or full-semester courses.

Bio: As a course mentor at Western Governors University, Katherine Porter, Ph.D. has helped build and develop structured workshops to support online students in working through integrated science courses. As a data geek, she finds the analytical tools available through MailChimp to be very helpful in monitoring the engagement of workshop students. She’s also a big fan of efficiency, so using the automation possibilities of Google forms, FormMule, and MailChimp to minimize manual oversight of workshops has been a big plus.

Kara Lukin, PhD is a course mentor at Western Governors University. For 20 years, she has taught science at K-20 levels in the classroom, online and in informal settings. She has an extensive background in developing engaging science curricula using active learning strategies as well as creating and directing training opportunities for educators. She has been leveraging the analytics in MailChimp to target outreach to struggling students in large-format courses and inform the selection of educational hooks and engagement activities for large and small enrollment courses. 

Description:
10 minutes: introductions and overview--how do we use these tools, and how might they be useful for you?
10 minutes: Overview of Google forms and setting up a sample form
10 minutes: Demo of setting up FormMule
20 minutes: Hands-on practice setting up FormMule
10 minutes: Demo of MailChimp
20 minutes: Hands-on practice setting up MailChimp and using the analytics
10 minutes: wrap up with Q & A and audience discussion of applications
Participants will need to bring a laptop (not a tablet) with wifi capability, and it would be helpful if they already have a Google account.

David Lyons | Your Slides Are Terrible and Other Presentation Sins

Organization: Instructure

Role: Conference Speaker

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Innovative Presentation Design, Universal Design for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning Objective(s):

Improve your slides
Improve your presentations

Abstract: This presentation will cover some of the most common things you do wrong when presenting. It is unlikely you realize you're doing many of these, which is why it's imperative that someone tells you to stop. I am that someone. I will deliver useful tips in a tongue-in-cheek fashion. If you want to up your speaking game, this is the session for you.

Bio: David Lyons has been working in academic technology for his entire career and that means attending and speaking at conferences nationwide. A firm believer that doing something is not the same as practicing something, David has studied the difference between good, bad, and mediocre presentations and tested the research and his theories in front of hundreds of people. When not in front of a crowd David is a podcaster, gamer, and all around good guy.

[Anchor]

Alyssa Martoccio | Putting the Fun in Phonetics: Tech Tools for Pronunciation and Language Skills

Organization:University of Colorado- Denver

Role: Assistant Professor- Spanish

Session Type: Research Presentation

Topic(s): Assessments, Innovations in Learning, Research

Learning objective(s):

Learn how pronunciation is learned and how best it should be taught in general, using technology
Understand student attitudes toward pronunciation and how they affect learning

Abstract: This presentation will discuss use of technology 1) to improve student pronunciation in the foreign language classroom, based on what I learned from my phonetics project and 2) how to use technology to improve student learning in the foreign language classroom in general. The online, collaborative course projectcreated by the presenter for her Spanish phonetics course allow students to practice and improve their pronunciation, change their attitudes toward pronunciation, and compare their own pronunciation to that of classmates. Examples of You Tube movie trailers, songs, other videos, websites and online materials (some specific to Spanish), which aid in pronunciation, cultural understanding, listening comprehension and writing skills, will also be shared.

Bio: Dr. Alyssa Martoccio is an assistant professor of Spanish at the University of Colorado, Denver, whose research focuses on second language acquisition of Spanish and other foreign languages, specifically classroom research and the acquisition of grammar. Her main research interests are focused on how to use second language acquisition research to improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages. In addition to her research, she has also taught at all levels of Spanish- beginning, intermediate and advanced courses in subjects such as grammar, oral Spanish, phonetics, service learning, second language acquisition, and the teaching and learning of heritage speakers.

Grant Matheny | What Can We Learn in Games? Academic Projects in Eve Online

Organization: University of Colorado Boulder- ASSETT Program

Role: Technical Director

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Other

Learning objective(s):

Understand that games in the classroom can facilitate valuable, evaluatable learning
Leave with strategies for incorporating games that are area/level appropriate for the attendees' real teaching needs

Abstract: If you’ve ever attended a “gaming in education” session, you’ve probably heard about all the awesome K-8 lessons you can teach through off-the-shelf commercial games. Maybe (like me) you’ve wondered, "What about those of us teaching more complex subjects?" This talk will explore some of the high school and undergraduate-level work being done by the players of Eve Online and other popular MMORPGs within and around those game worlds. Learn how innovaters have opened fully-functional investment banks, catalogued star types, written travel guides and short fiction, created feature-length machinima, and developed game-world shipping companies entrusted with 6.1 million real US Dollars' worth of virtual freight each year.

Bio: Grant Matheny is the Technical Director for CU-Boulder's ASSETT program, an English teacher, and an avid gamer. He has been interested in the educational value of games for the past 25 years and, over his past 6 years working with ASSETT, has been trying to find ways to realize that value in the classroom in a way that’s accessible for teachers with limited time and budget.

[button url="http://assett.colorado.edu/coltt-2015-what-we-can-learn-from-games/" size="small" target="_blank"]Presentation Materials

Alex McDaniel | Academic Ethos: A Practical Wisdom Approach to Embracing Disruptive Technologies

Organization: Metro State University

Role: Senior Instructional Designer, Interactive Applications Developer- Educational Technology Center

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Changing Role of Faculty. Disruptive Innovations, Elements of Engagement

Learning Objectives:

Mindfulness of academic outcomes and how to incorporate emerging technology in teaching practices
Learning the importance of a non-prohibitive stance regarding technology and encouraging access
How to incorporatate technology into the learning process in less punitive, more beneficial ways

Abstract: This session will address the importance of academic ethos regarding the challenges of rapidly changing and emergent technologies. We will consider cycles of adoption and resistance to critical technologies throughout history, including certain tipping points that have driven change and technology adoption. The presenter will discuss academic ethos as a philosophical standpoint that embraces rapid technological advancements while maintaining the fundamental principles of imparting knowledge and cultivating wisdom.

Bio: A former US Army Military Intelligence Non Commissioned Officer, Alex McDaniel earned his BS in Organizational Communication from Metropolitan State University of Denver and his MA in Instructional Design and Adult Learning from the University of Colorado Denver. Alex has presented on the importance of a balanced academic ethos in a wide variety of academic venues and currently supports Metro State as the Senior Instructional Designer and Interactive Applications Developer at the Educational Technology Center.

Kate Miller | Designing a Mobile-Ready Course with Universal Design

Organization: University of Colorado- Denver

Role: CU Online

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Universal Designs for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning objective(s):

Understand what makes an online course accessible
Learn what is accessible content and what is not

Abstract: Kate Miller has worked at CU Denver for over 10 years and has been with CU Denver's CU Online department for nearly nine of those 10 years. Kate's key areas of interest include student success, survey analysis, oversight of student services initiatives (which include, tutoring, early alert and course satisfaction) and universal design. Kate hopes to continue cultivating valuable campus-wide relationships to improve the student experience.

Bio: Kate Miller has worked at CU Denver for over 10 years and has been with CU Denver's CU Online department for nearly nine of those 10 years. Kate's key areas of interest include student success, survey analysis, oversight of student services initiatives (which include, tutoring, early alert and course satisfaction) and universal design. Kate hopes to continue cultivating valuable campus-wide relationships to improve the student experience.

Art Morgan (Moderator) Mark Gammon / Carla Hoskins / Duncan McBogg / Scott Houck | Welcoming for All: More Inclusive Campus Communities Through Closed Captioning

Organization: Automatic Sync Technologies / CU-Boulder / MSU Denver

Role: CaptionSync

Session Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Universal Design for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning Objective(s):

Increase understanding of closed captioning for campuses including requirements, challenges, strategies, and solutions.
Understand how closed captioning can benefit all learners, and how it fits in with Universal Design for Learning principles.

Abstract: This session will offer insight into how two large Colorado campuses transformed closed captioning from a daunting challenge, fraught with uncertainties about litigation and legal inquiries, into an opportunity to leverage captioned video and Universal Design principles to build more inclusive learning communities. The panel includes staff members with in-depth experience and diverse perspectives from the trenches of campus closed captioning implementations. The highly interactive discussion will provide specific examples and touch on a wide variety of scenarios to help inform your own captioning efforts including how to get started with captioning on your campus, how to do it yourself (or how not to), addressing budget challenges, and redesigning courses to handle closed captioning workflows.

Bio: Art Morgan (Session Facilitator), Automatic Sync Technologies:
Art has over 20 years of experience working with enterprise, education, nonprofit, and government customers and partners on software development and integration projects. His primary areas of expertise are voice, mobile, and video platforms and tools. Art joined the CaptionSync by AST team in 2010, building on his passion for making education opportunities available to people of all backgrounds and learning styles.

Mark Gammon, CU-Boulder:
Mark is a sociologist, researcher, and educator who is interested in the intersection of people and technology. As a Learning Experience Designer with the Academic Technology Design Team at CU-Boulder he works on strategic campus projects related to technology and education. Mark helped launch the closed captioning pilot project at CU-Boulder and currently serves as its project manager.

Scott Houck, Metropolitan State University of Denver:
Scott Houck is Assistant Director of the Educational Technology Center (ETC) at Metropolitan State University of Denver. The ETC collaboratively enhances teaching and learning through the innovative and effective use of educational technology. The ETC designs, develops, implements and supports systems, services and products which are essential to teaching and learning both online and in the classroom.

Duncan McBogg, CU-Boulder:
Duncan McBogg works for the University of Colorado Boulder’s Office of Information Technology, where he is the Program Manager of Distance Learning Services. His background includes instructional design, A/V systems design, video production, video post production, video conferencing, web conferencing, and lecture capture. His passion for video eventually led to a passion for how to make videos more accessible, which naturally led to an interest in captioning and rich audio description. In late 2014, he helped launch CU-Boulder’s closed captioning pilot as its initial project manager and subject matter expert. Currently, Duncan serves as the President of the Colorado Distance Learning Association.

Tim Noteboom | Teaching and Learning Catalyst: Experiences Using Examsoft

Organization: Regis University

Role: Assistant Dean- School of Physical Therapy

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Assessment, Innovations in Learning, Learning Analytics that Work

Learning objective(s):

Describe the increased emphasis of learning analytics in graduate school education
Demonstrate the key features of an assessment-man agement solution
Provide highlights of the first two semesters using ExamSoft platform

Abstract: ExamSoft, an assessment-management solution that offers a number of key features, including a centralized question bank, question tagging, student feedback, and curricular outcomes compliance. This session will provide context of the assessment process, the key features of ExamSoft, and our initial experiences in using this innovative assessment solution.

Bio: Tim Noteboom is Assistant Dean in the School of Physical Therapy at Regis University. For the past 20 years, Dr. Noteboom has been a faculty member and administrator in an innovative clinical doctorate program. He has taught in ground-based, online & hybrid courses and has implementeda a flipped-classroom approach. He is a frequent presenter on educational technology topics and has recently been responsible for implementing a mobile learning initiative and an electronic testing and learner analytics platform in the physical therapy program.

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Carol Parenteau / Phil McCready | Quality Matters Learner Success Program Certification: Is It Worth It?

Organization: University of the Rockies

Role: Manager of Academic Quality, Quality Matters Coordinator

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Assessment

Learning Objective(s):

Explain the purpose of QM Learner Success Program Certification
Evaluate learner success in a given sample program
Evaluate the costs and benefits of participation in QM Learners Success Program Certification

Abstract: This workshop will share the insider’s perspective on essential tools and guidance needed to navigate the Quality Matter’sTM Program Certification. The audience will be invited to act as QM reviewers using real-world submissions (all identifying material removed). Given the evidence provided, will the institution meet or not meet the criteria? How will your results compare with the actual, real-world outcome? The workshop facilitators successfully helped University of the Rockies secure both the QM Online Learner Success and Program Design Certifications, making it one of the first universities in the country to hold these institution-wide certifications. This rigorous benchmark required substantive evidence of learning achievement, supported by systems of program assessment capable of identifying deficiencies and driving actionable improvement.

Bio: Carol Parenteau is Manager of Academic Quality at University of the Rockies and Quality Matters Coordinator. She works with the assessment, instructional design, and faculty assessment teams to ensure that courses, programs, and assessment processes support student learning and continuous improvement.
Carol is an experienced higher education instructor, designer, and administrator. She is member of Quality Matters Study Group for program certification and co-organizer of Café Foresight, a future of learning workshop series to attract learning innovators in higher-Ed. She is also member of SheSays Denver leadership committee, an organization supporting women who work in digital creative, technology, and business.

Phil McCready is a researcher, data analyst, and development economist working in economic development and in higher education. At University of the Rockies he is part of the Assessment & Academic Quality team. His responsibilities include the analysis and reporting of student learning outcomes. He also fills in as an adjunct professor teaching on research methods.
As a development economist, Phil has significant experience in research, data analytics, complex projects, strategic planning, presenting and teaching in his field of expertise. Phil is organizer of Café Foresight, a future of learning workshop series to attract learning innovators in higher-Ed, and founder of the GrowStrong Institute, a coalition of professionals working to create next-generation data tools to help the economic growth of businesses and communities.

Description:

Agenda

Introduction of presenters and topic - 5 minutes
What is QM Learner Success Certification? - Criteria - 5 minutes
Describe activity, form groups, distribute materials - 5 minutes
Group review of "Overview" of a program (provided) - 7 minutes
Group review of learner success evidence ( provided) - 10 minutes
Groups report preliminary results to all - 7 minutes
Facilitators respond to reports – direct participants to consider additional required evidence – 5 minutes
Debrief evaluating costs and benefits- 6 minutes

Cory Pavicich | Getting to Inbox 0

Organization: University of Colorado-Boulder

Role: Academic Technology Consultant- Academic Technology Design

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Other

Learning Objective(s):

Participants will know and use the four Ds to process an email or task
Participants will properly categorize a task onto a projects, next actions, waiting for, or someday/maybe list
Participants will feel less alone

Abstract: Do you have thousands of emails in your inbox? Do your emails sit for days (weeks?!) flagged, started, or marked unread, as reminders to get to them later? This interactive, high-energy session covers the core principles of getting to inbox 0 and staying there. Informed by David Allen's "Getting Things Done," this session presents strategies for processing email and maintaining tasks/projects in simple and reliable systems. Participants will leave with strategies for zeroing their inboxes, a fresh framework for managing tasks, projects, and priorities, and suggestions on software that can support these healthy practices.

Bio: Cory Pavicich is a Learning Experience Designer (LXD) at the University of Colorado Boulder. The LXDs–part of the larger Academic Technology Design Team–partner with University leadership to solve high-impact learning problems. Cory holds a M.Ed. from Harvard University, helped lead the launch of Coursera at CU, and is a seven-time presenter at the Google Teacher Academy. Although he receives thousands of emails each year he is likely arrive at this event with zero emails in his inbox.

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Cory Pavicich | Premortem: Averting Catastrophe in Introduction to Engineering

Organization: University of Colorado-Boulder

Role: Academic Technology Consultant- Academic Technology Design

Session Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Effective Blended Learning Practices, Innovations in Learning

Learning Objective(s):

Participants will be able to apply the use of a premortem in their own projects
Participants will leave with at least one new idea for delivering blended learning at scale
Participants will finally feel that their negativity and pessimism are important components of educational innovation.

Abstract: Calling all skeptics, cynics, doubters, and pessimists! Join Learning Experience Designers from CU-Boulder in imaging ways blended residential learning might meet with disaster. Session participants will learn about the ongoing MOOC-like redesign of Introduction to Engineering, recognized as a top 5 CU System innovation of 2014 by the CU Shared Practices program. Session participants will learn and use the powerful project review technique of the premortem to help foresee, and maybe prevent, the possible ruinous outcomes of a project.

Bio: Cory Pavicich holds a Masters in Learning and Teaching from Harvard University, and serves as an Academic Technology Consultant for the CU-Boulder Academic Technology Design Team. He has worked for almost 10 years in Educational Technology, and is a seven-time presenter at the Google Teacher Academy.

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Steve Pillow | The Digital Tools and Strategies You Need to Enhance Your Instruction

Organization: Emily Griffith Technical College

Role: Academic Curriculum Coordinator

Session Type:Technology Round-up, BYOL

Topic(s): Open Educational Resources

Learning objective(s): 

Learning integration of Google Tools
Utilizing Web 2.0 tools to enhance online, blended, and face-to-face classes

Abstract: Attendees will learn and implement many widely recognized practices using a variety of tools for creating Moodle courses. Integrating outside tools in an LMS such as Google Drive, Socrative, Explee, and many more free open source tools will be demonstrated and time given to actually practice. This session is BYOL.

Bio: Steve Pillow developed the technology courses that partner with the education sequence classes: Technology and the Exceptional Learner; Technology and Differentiated Instruction; and Technology with Curriculum and Assessment. His responsibilities at MNU include training faculty and staff using Moodle in course design. As an educational technology leader, he was previously a trainer for the Technology Leadership Academy in Missouri, and a technology specialist and director of technology for a K-12 district. In 2011 he became a Certified Moodle 2 Administrator and hosts several Moodle sites for schools and businesses with custom development. Steve is currently Academic Curriculum Coordinator in the eLearning Department at Emily Griffith Technical College.

Description: This workshop is an extension from last years with new tools and opportunities to try the tools presented. Participants will need their own laptop to be engaged.

Demo of Portrait Avatar Maker
Free Music resources
Demo of how to use Socrative and for informal assessment
Demo Explee, WeVideo, and other video creation sites
Discuss and explore using Google tools
Hands-on practice throughout the demonstration

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Russ Poulin/Amy Kahn | Navigating State Authorization: Key Considerations and Perspectives

Organization: University of the Rockies (Kahn)

Role: Vice Provost (Kahn)

Session Type:Debate Panel

Topic(s):Other

Learning Objective(s):

Understand what it means to be compliant
Understanding how Federal and State Regulations, triggering the need for compliance, and SARA effect your institution
Evaluate how best practices apply to the specific parameters of your institution

Abstract:As more and more Universities expand with online campuses and multi-state locations, they are finding that navigating Authorization-land is a complex system of checks and balances. What does it mean to be compliant? What are Federal and State regulations? What non-distance education activities of my college may trigger the need to seek compliance? Who should be concerned with the Regulations? How does SARA impact the future of compliance and why is this important for our schools? This panel presentation and discussion provides an opportunity to reflect on and learn about these important State Authorizations.

Bio: Russ Poulin organizes WCET's national policy and research activities, edits WCET's Frontiers blog, coordinates WCET's research efforts, and works on elearning consortia issues. He represented distance education in the U.S. Department of Education's 2014 Negotiated Rulemaking process. Previously, he coordinated distance education activities for the North Dakota University System. He holds a Bachelor's degree from the University of Colorado Denver and a Master's from the University of Northern Colorado. Contacts: @RussPoulin or rpoulin@wiche.edu.

Amy Kahn, Vice Provost, joined the University of the Rockies with nearly 20 years in education and as a leader in business. In her current role, Kahn helps manage the accreditation process, State and Federal compliance, quality and assessment, and academic operations. Kahn’s research has focused on creating individual and institutional change for organizations with a specific concentration on workforce diversity balanced with strategic business alignment. In 2015, she released a textbook titled: “The Ecology of Diversity: Individual, Cultures and Societies

Michelle Raese | Poll Dancing in the Classroom and Other Tools of Engagement

Organization: University of Colorado International English Center

Role: Professor of Academic Writing and Research

Session Type: Technology Round-up

Topic(s): Assessments, Elements of Engagement, Mobile Technology and Devices

Learning objective(s):

Students will engage in developing questioning strategies
Learn to use polling and sureys for assessment
Use smart phones as a classroom response system

Abstract: Using mobile technology and devices in the classroom to enhance questioning strategies engages the class, helps in assessing understanding, and develops questioning frameworks. Research shows that questioning strategies create context for exploration of ideas and allow students to take ownership of the discussion. The presenter will first poll the audience and then demonstrate free and easy tools for conducting polls and surveys which teachers and students can use to create inquiries and critical thinking questions that stimulate discussion and debate.

Bio: Michelle Raese has a bachelor's degree in Linguistics and a master's degree in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL). She is an actual Boulder native and currently teaches Academic Writing and Research at CU's International English Center.

Shannon Rathod / Brad Hinson | Co-Constructing Digital Pedagogies: Leveraging Learning Assistant and TechTA Support

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder / University of Colorado- Denver

Role: PhD Candidate

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Assessments, Changing Role of Faculty

Learning objective(s):

Understand the benefits of co-constructing instructional design and online student engagement
Understand the necessity for alternative spaces for students to learn in an online course

Abstract: This presentation will explore two models of faculty support and co-construction of digital pedagogies. We will examine the pedagogical benefits of faculty partnerships with a Learning Assistant (CU Boulder) and/or TechTAs (CU Denver). Participants will leave the session equipped with concrete examples of how these kinds of support teams operate and how crowdsourcing instructional design enhances outcomes for all parties.

Bio: Shannon Rathod is a PhD candidate in English at University of Colorado Boulder. She has taught undergraduate courses at CU for eight years, as a master’s and doctoral student. Earning a Digital Pedagogy Grant in 2012, she taught English online through Continuing Education and was a tutor for the Online Composition Hub, CU’s first online writing center. Shannon has several years of experience teaching pedagogy, as well as teaching abroad.

Brad Hinson is the Director of Digital Initiatives & Innovation at the CU Denver School of Education & Human Development (SEHD). He works, learns, and plays at the crossroads of academic and information technology in higher education for 20 years and currently tinkers with grandiose ideas and disruptions at CU Denver. @bradhinson

Description: Fostering interaction and engagement continues to be a primary concern in the digital classroom. This session will explore two models of leveraging pedagogical support staff to improve course design as well as student retention, engagement, and performance. First, initially established at CU Boulder for talented students interested in STEM education, the Learning Assistant model hires undergraduates to assist faculty in redesigning and teaching courses. Second, the CU Denver School of Education and Human Development (SEHD) leverages graduate students from its own Instructional Learning Technologies (ILT) program to partner with faculty in co-constructing the online student experience. This session will reveal how these partnerships encourage instructors to stretch their own ideas and notions, reexamine their courses, create alternative student spaces for learning, and emphasize collaboration.

Normandy Roden/Travis Chillemi | It's About Time: Creating Visual Chronologies to Enhance Learning

Organization: University of Colorado- System

Role: System Office- University Controller

Session Type: Technology Round-up

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement, Innovative Presentation Design

Learning Objectives:

Review a variety of low-cost/no-cost tools to develop visual displays of time-related information
Step through different types of visual timelines created in these tools
Take away tips for best practices in designing the above

Abstract:“Everybody talks about time, but nobody does anything about it.” (Mark Twain, paraphrased)
No matter your topic of teaching or communication, there’s a time when you have to talk about time. What event occurred in this place on this date? When must students complete tasks and how/where will they receive direction? How is your workshop organized and when will participants get a break?
These seem to be simple pieces of information to convey, so many choose to convey them simply. (Do I hear "bulleted list" --?). But why not do better than that? Why not use creative chronologies that engage attention, incorporate instruction, and promote retention?
This session reviews multiple tools for developing visual timelines, along with recommended uses/best practices.

Bio: In the CU System Office of University Controller, Normandy and Travis create and communicate fiscal policy and procedural information and develop online resources for employees of all CU campuses.

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Sandra Sawaya | Designing for Synchronous Learning Experiences Between F2F and Online Students

Organization: University of Colorado-Boulder

Role: Academic Design Strategy Manager- Office of Information Technololgy

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Effective Blended Learning Devices, Innovations in Learning

Learning objective(s):

Learn about the design and implementation of the synchronous hybrid model of teaching and learning
Understand the challenges faced and lessons learned with synthronous hybrid model development

Abstract: Teaching and learning models in higher education have traditionally been completely face-to-face (teaching & learning 1.0), completely online (2.0), or a blend of both (2.5). The College of Education at Michigan State University has been experimenting with a teaching and learning model where face-to-face and online students participate in the same learning experience at the same time: the synchronous hybrid model (teaching & learning 3.0). This presentation introduces this innovative model, describes its design and implementation in several graduate courses at the College of Education at Michigan State, and discusses the challenges faced and lessons learned along the way.

Bio: Sandra Sawaya is an advanced PhD student in the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology program at Michigan State University. For the past two years, she has been involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of hybrid courses where face-to-face and online graduate students interact synchronously with each other as well as with the instructor in a shared learning experience. Currently, Sandra is the academic design strategy manager in the Office of Information Technology at the University of Colorado Boulder.

John Bell is an associate professor in the College of Education (COE) at Michigan State University (MSU) and director of the CEPSE/COE Design Studio, a resource in support of MSU COE faculty in the use of various technologies (primarily online technologies) for teaching and learning. His research interests include abductive teaching and learning with technology as well as synchronous hybrid (integrated online and face-to-face) classes.

William Cain is a doctoral student in the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology program at Michigan State University and Assistant Director of the CEPSE/COE Design Studio. His research interests focus on innovations in learning and teaching in technology-rich environments, as well as design and strategies for emerging educational technologies.

Diane Sieber | Guild Wars: Addressing the Debate About Gamifying Higher Education Learning

Organization: University of Colorado-Boulder

Role: Associate Dean for Education-College of Engineering

Session Type: Research Presentation

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Elements of Engagements, Mobile Technology and Devices

Learning objective(s):

Participants will understand the distinction between designing intrinsic and extrinsic motivators
Participants will take away practical recommendations for incorporating game motivators into their courses and curricula

Abstract: This session presents ongoing research and recommendations for improving the higher education learning experience through game-based engagement strategies. Research addresses individual courses redesigned for increased engagement and promotes the overall integration of game-based mechanisms across a multi-department college. Student focus groups, surveys and responses to change point to numerous ways in which we can leverage new technologies, mobile applications and solid pedagogical design for greater student engagement, learning and persistence on the higher education campus. Specific examples include mechanisms to provide real-time feedback, to incentivize risk and promote recovery from failure, to reward exploration beyond minimum requirements, and to provide students with a sense of trajectory, progress and an overall sense of agency in their own educational journey.

Bio: Diane Sieber is the Associate Dean for Education in the College of Engineering at CU-Boulder and a President’s Teaching Scholar. Her research areas include two eras of technology-driven communication revolution: Renaissance Europe immediately post printing press, and the current networked digital age. She has published recently on learning through online social networks, the gamification of educational experience, and addressing learner digital distraction--by laptops, tablets and mobile phones--in classroom settings.

Sam Spiegel | Through the Looking Glass: Teaching F2F Through Online Simulations and Tasks

Organization: Colorado School of Mines

Role: Director- Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning

Session Type: Research Presentation

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Innovations in Learning, Research

Learning objective(s):

Learn about design considerations when shifting a face-to-face activity to an online only experience
Consider issues with teaching face-to-face pedagogy through online courses
Review results from a study in the use of simulations and an online course to teach pre-service elementary education students.

Abstract: This session will share results from a three-year study in the use of simulations and an online course for pre-service elementary education students science teaching methods.The simulations were used to support students in gathering and analyzing data through online partner discussions in a manner that allowed reflection on transfer of practices to a face-to-face teaching model. In this session, we will examine a face-to-face version of the experience, consider the design perspectives of the simulation and online course design to emulate face-to-face practices, and review results of the study. Initial analysis suggests that students in the online version were more accountable, but it required more time and facilitation to engage the students in the first simulation.

Bio: Sam Spiegel is Director of the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning at the Colorado School of Mines. He served as Chair of Disciplinary Literacy in Science and as Associate Director of the Engineering Education Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh; Director of Research & Development for a multimedia company; and founding Director of the Center for Integrating Research & Learning (CIRL) at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. CIRL was recognized as one of the leading National Science Foundation Laboratories for activities to promote science, mathematics, and technology (STEM) education. His current efforts focus on innovation of teaching resources and practices.

Rebecca Swanson | Developing a Virtual Teacher Learning Community with Google Tools

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Doctoral Student

Session Type: Research Presentation

Topic(s): Research

Learning objective(s):

Identify characteristics of teacher learning communities
Describe the tools that can be used in forming an online teacher community

Abstract: The vTLC: virtual Teacher Learning Community project developed a virtual community of practice using free, readily available online social media and content sharing tools. The technological innovation was in exploring the ways in which a teacher learning community could be formed using online social tools rather than meeting in-person. The project studied how novice and experienced teachers engaged in reflection of their teaching practices in an online environment. It combined an established model for science teacher professional development, developed by Dr. Erin Furtak, with a suite of online tools. We will describe the formation of the community over the past school year and present the results of our analysis of the ways technology afforded and constrained the development of a teacher learning community.

Bio: Rebecca Swanson is a doctoral student in the CU-Boulder School of Education, focusing on Curriculum & Instruction in Science Education and served as Research Assistant on this project. Prior to coming to Colorado, Rebecca was a credentialed science teacher in California, teaching elementary school science for over a decade.

Primary Co-Presenter: Jason Buell is a doctoral student in the CU-Boulder School of Education, focusing on Curriculum & Instruction in Science Education. Jason served as Research Assistant on this project. Jason taught middle and elementary school science in California public schools.

Dr. Erin Marie Furtak holds a Ph.D in Curriculum and Instruction in Science Education from Stanford University. Over the course of her career, Dr. Furtak has led several research projects that successfully engaged teachers in in-person professional development over extended periods of time.

Alysha Tarantino | Using MOOC's to Attract/Reach New Audiences

Organization: Colorado State University

Role: Program Manager- CSU Online

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement, Open Educational Resources (OER)

Learning objective(s):

Attendees will be given insights and tips for entering into MOOCs
Attendees will understand possible gains from offering certain types of open education on a massive scale

Abstract: As a Research 1 Land-Grant University, Colorado State University is always trying new ways to reach new audiences and provide education to all those who strive for it. In 2012, MOOCs gained popularity for their course sizes and their free content. OnlinePlus was excited about this new course-concept and decided to experiment with it taking course proposals from interested parties and using a non-major and free platform (CourseSites by Blackboard).
In this presentation we will give an overview of our MOOC venture, outline lessons we learned from our experiment, touch on how we are moving forward and adapting ourselves to fit the need of our students and the environment, and prove that with limited resources we have reached populations of students that we were otherwise unknown to.

Bio: Alysha Tarantino is a Program Manager with Colorado State University, OnlinePlus and has worked in Higher Education for nearly 8 years. She earned her bachelor's degree from Metropolitan State University of Denver and is currently working on her master's in Organizational Learning Performance and Change at CSU. At OnlinePlus she specializes in process creation and change and working with new projects or processes. She has been researching and working with MOOCs from the start of OnlinePlus’ exploration, and has been a team lead on this initiative

Elaine Chen is an Instructional Designer with Colorado State University, The Institute for Learning and Teaching (TILT). Elaine is an advocate of lifelong learning. She earned her bachelor's degree from the Open University in Taiwan. In her graduate studies, she focused on Educational Computing, Design, and Online Learning, earning a master's degree in Educational Computing and a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction. At TILT she develops online courses, produces multimedia projects, and designs and maintains MOOC courses for OnlinePlus."

David Thomas / Michael Edwards | One Weird Trick: Feedback

Organization: CU Denver / CU System

Role: Thomas- Director of Academic Technology- CU Online
         Edwards-Academic Technology Coordinator- CU Online

Session Type: Discussion

Topic(s): Assessment, Changing Role of Faculty, Elements of Engagement

Learning objective(s):

An increased awareness of the significant impact of feedback relative to other teaching activities, informed by research
Feedback strategies that work in the classroom and online

Abstract:Teaching is hard. And teaching with technology can seem daunting, but once you weed through all the prepared lecture materials, final exams, assigned readings, and group discussions, it turns out that one teaching activity rises above all others as critical to student success: feedback. Find out how feedback works, why it matters, and how it unlocks the value of your courses. Like the Internet says, come learn about this one weird trick!

Bio: David Thomas is the Director of Academic Technology at CU Online supporting the 13 schools & colleges of CU Denver since 2002. His responsibilities cover the selection and management of the technology used in the delivery of online and face-to-face classes. His team provides critical support to faculty that use digital technology to teach. As an academic, he has a PhD in architecture and planning, with a scholarly focus on games, digital media, and what makes places fun. He is a board member of Colorado Distance Learning Association.

Michael Edwards is a Multimedia Designer for the CU System with a background in instructional design, online training and teaching. He’s designed online faculty training and taught a class about Webinars for the CU Denver School of Education for years. Before moving into multimedia work, he worked for nearly 5 years at CU Online.

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Dan Tinianow | Bridging the F2F Gap: A Case Study in Video Sharing-based Presentations

Organization: Ashford University

Role: Chair of Communication Studies, Lead Academic Developer

Session Type: Technology round-up

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement, Open Educational Resources (OER), Other

Learning objective(s):

Detailed insight into the integration of video presentation sharing technology in three online courses at Ashford University
Extrapolating from current experiences with this technology to how it might be used most effectively in other disciplines
Understand the capabilities and applications of the YouSeeU technology in online instruction

Abstract: One of the key challenges in online instruction is loss of the personal contact that exists in the traditional classroom. Because the face-to-face, or “F2F” component is not central to instructional content, its absence has not been an impetus for greater efforts towards its restoration in typical online instruction. Ashford University has recently begun implementation of video sharing technology that restores some of the F2F component in the online classroom, and is currently researching expanding the use of this technology. This session demonstrates the technology, details its successes so far, and presents an early look at the research into its expanded application.

Bio: Dan Tinianow is the chair of Communication Studies and acts as the lead academic developer for SPE103 Oral Communication at Ashford University, which introduced YouSeeU technology to Ashford University instruction. SPE103 has been hailed as an outstanding implementation of an online speech course by experienced instructors, and its integration of YouSeeU technology has been praised by the technology’s developer. Mingzhen Bao is the Department Chair of Communication Arts and Program Chair of Linguistics at Ashford University. She is the principal investigator of a study examining the potential for YouSeeU integration into other parts of the Ashford University curriculum, under the auspices of the Ashford University Fellowship Program.

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Nicole Townsend | Just In Time Teaching: Making Time for Learning in a Surgical Residency

Organization: University of Colorado- School Medicine

Role: Fourth-year resident

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Assessment, Changing Role of Faculty, Digital Texts

Learning objective(s):

Identify barriers to didactic curricula in the current Graduate Medical Education (GME) environment
Demonstrate Just-in-Time-Teaching as an adult learning technique
Understand flexibility of curriculum software to adapt to multiple adult educational needs

Abstract: Regulations limiting maximum duty-hours for medical residents have placed significant strain on faculty and residents striving to achieve quality patient care while also achieving quality teaching and learning. Journal articles are essential in medical education, but residents may not have the time or training to identify landmark papers that serve as the foundation of evidence-based clinical practice. We introduced to the Department of Surgery a curriculum software adapting active teaching techniques to an online platform. With Just-in-Time Teaching, faculty acquaint learners with reading material on a topic, in this case landmark articles in surgery. Discussion with learners then revolves around: (1) residents’ level of understanding, (2) pertinent questions, and (3) misconceptions . Working with residents on an evidence-based curriculum will better prepare residents to demonstrate requisite competency in ACGME Practice-Based Learning and Improvement milestones.

Bio: Dr. Nicole Townsend is a fourth year resident in the Department of Surgery at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, where she also earned her MD. She earned her undergraduate degree from Harvard University. She has spent the last two years conducting dedicated education research, focused specifically on curriculum development and standardized clinical examination design, resulting in multiple publications and national presentations. She has been awarded the Surgical Education Research Fellowship through the Association of Surgical Education, which she will complete in the Spring of 2015.

Dr. Nina Glass is a fellow in Trauma, Acute Care Surgery, and Surgical Critical Care at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. She completed her General Surgery Residency at NYU Langone Medical Center in June 2014. She earned her MD at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and did her undergraduate work at Harvard College. She is an established academician with 19 publications to date and over 30 presentations. This past year she was awarded the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Research and Education Foundation Scholarship. Additionally, she was awarded the Surgical Education and Research Fellowship by the Association for Surgical Education.

Scott Trudeau | Adobe Photoshop Creative Cloud 2015

Organization: Adobe Corporation

Role: Senior Solutions Engineer

Session Type: Hands-on Workshop

Topic(s): Innovative Presentation Design, Integrating Arts and Technology

Learning Objective(s):

Attendees will edit images using new Photoshop CC 2015 features
Attendees will see how to use Photoshop to collaborate "libraries" with other faculty and students
Attendees will see how new Photoshop CC 2015 features allow for streamlined design for mobile, desktop, and print

Abstract: The world's best imaging and design app now features even more creative possibilities with new tools for design and photography, connecting your desktop and mobile apps with all your creative assets, so you can make amazing visual content on any device.

Bio: Scott Trudeau is a Senior Solutions Engineer with Adobe for the North America Education team. He has a long history of using Adobe products in education. After working for many years as a Technology Consultant and Web Design Specialist in Texas, he now focuses on helping schools and universities effectively integrate a variety of Adobe solutions into their institutions. Scott is frequently traveling around the country presenting and meeting about, “all things Adobe.”

Description: Adobe Photoshop CC 2015 provides new features that streamline the creation of web, mobile, and print designs. In this hands-on session the attendee will learn how to prepare content for mobile, edit video, create 3D content, and collaborate using Adobe libraries.

Scott Trudeau | Adobe Document Cloud and Adobe's New eSign Services

Organization: Adobe Corporation

Role: Senior Solutions Engineer

Session Type: Demonstration

Topic(s): Disruptive Innovations, Mobile Technology and Devices

Learning Objective(s):

Attendees will learn how to leverage Adobe Acrobat's document signing capabilities
Attendees will learn how to use Adobe Acrobat DC's new interface
Attendees will learn how to start and manage complex, multi-signature workflows

Abstract: Document Cloud combines Acrobat and PDF with online services so you can prepare and send documents for signature from anywhere. Make it easy for people to sign and return on any device. Track document progress in a dashboard. And store signed documents in the cloud.

Bio:Scott Trudeau is a Senior Solutions Engineer with Adobe for the North America Education team. He has a long history of using Adobe products in education. After working for many years as a Technology Consultant and Web Design Specialist in Texas, he now focuses on helping schools and universities effectively integrate a variety of Adobe solutions into their institutions. Scott is frequently traveling around the country presenting and meeting about, “all things Adobe.”

[Anchor]

Geeta Verma | Presence + Experience: Purposeful Design of Presence in Online Courses

Organization: University of Colorado- Denver

Role: Associate Professor of Science Education- School of Education and Human Development

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Elements of Engagement

Learning objective(s):

Describe the value of attending to social, cognitive, and teaching presence in online educational experiences
Identify instructional strategies that involve students in experiencing, examining, explaining, and applying activities in online learning
Use the Presence+Experience (P+E) framework to guide the design of online educational experiences

Abstract: In this presentation, we share a framework for the purposeful design of presence in online courses. Rather than developing something new, we looked at two models that have helped with previous instructional design projects, providing us with some assurance that the design decisions we were making were fundamentally sound. As we began to work with the two models, we noted that they could be overlaid to create a useful design framework for our efforts. The framework—what we refer to as the Presence+Experience (P+E) framework—merges the Community of Inquiry (CoI) model with Kolb’s experiential learning cycle. We used this framework to inform the redesign of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) method courses for eLearning delivery.

Bio: Geeta Verma is an associate professor of science education at University of Colorado Denver’s School of Education & Human Development. Her research work, grounded in sociocultural theory, integrates equity issues in science education, curriculum discourse and ethnic studies in immigrant communities. Dr. Verma has been leading the efforts in online course offerings in the STEM program area at CU Denver. She has designed and taught multiple online courses in STEM licensure and the master’s program. The National Science Foundation has funded her work related to recruitment and retention of minority students in STEM fields. Email: geeta.verma@ucdenver.edu

Heather Lynn Johnson, PhD, is an assistant professor of mathematics education at the University of Colorado Denver. Her research interests focus on secondary students’ mathematical reasoning and teacher support of such reasoning. Johnson has designed and taught online courses supporting prospective and practicing teachers’ development of content and pedagogical knowledge. She has been committed to connecting research and practice, receiving the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ Linking Research and Practice Outstanding Publication Award in 2014. Email: heather.johnson@ucdenver.edu

Joanna C. Dunlap, PhD, is an associate professor of instructional design and technology in the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Colorado Denver. An award-winning educator, her teaching and research interests focus on the use of sociocultural approaches to enhance learners’ development and experience in postsecondary settings. Recently, her work in this area has revolved around online teaching and learning, creative design practices, and faculty development. Email: joni.dunlap@ucdenver.edu

Danielle Walsh | Originality Check, Online Grading, and Peer Review for Improving Student Learning and Writing

Organization: Turnitin

Role: Account Manager

Session Type: Demonstration

Topic(s): Assessments, Other

Learning Objectives:

What is Turnitin
How to position Turnitin as a learning tool vs. punitive tool
Grading through Turnitin to enhance formative feedback

Abstract: Discover how Turnitin's originality checking, online grading and peer review can enhance, even revolutionize, both the teaching and learning experience. See a live demo and participate in a Q&A. Turnitin is dedicated to improving student learning through ensuring the originality of student writing as well as by providing faculty with tools to make grading a less painful and more meaningful experience. Learn what's new at Turnitin and what we have in the roadmap!

Bio: Dani Walsh has spent the past 17 years in the Higher Education Space specializing in Educational Content and Technologies. Most recently she has established herself with Turnitin, LLC, as an Account Manager. Her passion for Education and innovative tools to improve Student Learning lends itself to her role with Turnitin and as a resource for those who wish to improve student outcomes.

Gregory Wells | Online Education Without Borders: Delivering Education to Refugee Camps

Organization:Regis University

Role: Course Content Developer

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Changing Role of Faculty, Disruptive Innovations, Innovations in Learning

Learning objective(s):

Explore opportunities for online education outside the traditional educational system
Explain the overall process and delivery of content to non-traditional student populations
Describe the overall goals of the refugee educational program

Abstract: Regis University along with other Jesuit Universities and organizations have embarked on an ambitious and challenging plan to bring education to individuals who otherwise may never have the opportunity to take an online course and ultimately receive a certificate of completion in a specific discipline. The plan is to organize and deliver online courses to refugee camps in a number of countries across the globe. The presentation will cover the overall program goals and the technical, educational, and teaching challenges associated with the program as well as celebrating the joy of students who have completed the program.

Bio: Regis University and other Jesuit Universities have developed a program to deliver online course content to refugee camps across the globe. Since 2008, Gregory Wells has participated in the reading of student essays, developed course content for the program, facilitated courses, and managed a team of faculty in the delivery of content to the students. He has over 19 years of teaching experience in both the traditional and online environments as well as working over 6 years as an Instructional Designer in higher education.

Megan Welsh / Grace Haynes | Picture This! Instagrammable Education

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Inderdisciplinary Arts and Humanities Librarian

Session Type: Hands-on Workshop

Topic(s): Mobile Technology and Devices, Social Media in Education

Learning objective(s):

Participants will gain a basic understanding of using Instagram as a pedagogical tool
Participants will learn to integrate social media into their educational setting
Participants will be inspired to adapt presentation content for their own purposes

Abstract: Have you thought about engaging students through social media but don’t know where to start? Already using social media in your classroom,but wanting to expand beyond Facebook and Twitter? Learn firsthand how to integrate Instagram, one of the fastest growing social media platforms, into your educational setting through this interactive workshop. The presenters will demonstrate their use of Instagram to orient high school, college freshmen, and transfer students to the CU-Boulder University Libraries.

Bio: Megan E. Welsh is the Interdisciplinary Arts & Humanities Librarian at the University of Colorado Boulder. She is actively involved in welcoming new students to campus through outreach opportunities and in teaching students how to use the Libraries’ resources. Through library instruction classes and conversations with students, Megan discovered that there is a gap between the Libraries and transfer students especially. Seeking a fun way to engage these students with the Libraries, Megan leveraged her past experiences conducting library scavenger hunts and integrated social media to educate students about the Libraries. She looks forward to expanding her outreach in this way.

Grace Haynes works in Circulation and Outreach at the Howard B. Waltz Music Library, a branch of the University Libraries at the University of Colorado Boulder. As a member of the University Libraries Social Media Task Force, she is constantly developing ideas for engaging audiences through a wide variety of platforms. Grace is actively involved in creating new ways to build long-lasting relationships with students through positive experiences in the Libraries.

Description: This hands-on workshop will include a scavenger hunt, presentation, and discussion.

Specific Requirements:
Participants must bring a smartphone or mobile device that has Instagram installed on or the ability to download the free Instagram app.

Workshop Outline:
1.     Poll/Presenter Introductions/Time for participants to download Instagram: 5 min
2.     Presenter Demonstration: 15 min
3.     Scavenger Hunt Activity: 15 min
4.     Scavenger Hunt Debrief: 5 min
5.     Discussion: 5 min
6.     Questions & Answers: 5 min

 

[button url="http://bit.ly/InstagramatCOLTT" size="small" target="_blank"]Presentation Materials

Mark Werner | Crossing Campus Chasms to Create Accessibility Sevices

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: Associate Director- Academic Technology Strategy and Support

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Universal Design for Learning/ADA Compliance

Learning objective(s):

Participants will learn how to overcome and leverage organizational differences to create campus-wide services
Participants will learn how one university responded to a challenge to make ICT services and technologies accessible to all
Participants will learn practical advice for approaching the accessibility of ICT services

Abstract: Just over one year ago the University of Colorado Boulder received an investigation letter from the Department of Justice (DOJ) that addressed the accessibility of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on campus. This presentation will explain what led to the DOJ investigation, the contents of the letter, and the steps that CU Boulder is taking to ensure the accessibility and usability of ICTs to all students.

Our team of IT and Disability Services staff will share how we have bridged and leveraged organizational differences to approach our project. We will explain practical approaches we have taken to applications such as Google apps, placement exams, and learning management systems. We will articulate barriers we faced and discuss potential solutions.

Bio: Mark Werner is Associate Director of Academic Technology Strategy and Support at the University of Colorado Boulder. Previously he was Associate Director of Academic Technology Research, Manager of Instructional Technology Support Services, Academic Technology Coordinator, and instructor and assistant professor of technical communication. Mark holds a Ph.D in rhetoric and M.A. in English from Carnegie Mellon University. He holds a B.S. in technical communication from the University of Minnesota. He currently co-chairs the committee for ICT Accessibility Services and Support at the University of Colorado Boulder. His group provides universal design consultation to the University of Colorado Boulder campus.

Jill Sieben-Schneider received her B.A. from the University of Colorado Denver and M.A. from Ball State University in Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education. She is Assistant Director of the Disability Services office at the University of Colorado Boulder. Previously she was an Accommodation Specialist and coordinated the Transition Program in the McBurney Disability Resource Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has been a Graduate Assistant in the Office of Disabled Student Development at Ball State, and taught high school English in Denver. Her areas of interest include retention, program assessment, and transitional issues for students with disabilities.

John Meister is Director of Disability Services at the University of Colorado Boulder. John received his B.S. from Slippery Rock University, and a M.S. from the University of North Texas with a specialization in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling. John is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC). John is the past President of the Colorado and Wyoming Consortium of Support Programs for Students with Disabilities. John has served as a consultant to small private colleges and vocational schools in the areas of students, disability and equal access. Previously, John coordinated the Disability Resource Office at Colorado State University-Pueblo.

Paul O’Brian has worked for the University of Colorado for 20 years, 17 of those in Information Technology, as a developer, project manager, and service manager. He is currently the service manager for portals and mobile devices, overseeing sites that receive approximately 7 million hits per year. He received his bachelor’s and his master’s degree in English Literature from CU-Boulder.

Sienna Wood | Getting Your Software to Do the Work for You: Scripting, Macros, Styles, and Templates

Organization: University of Colorado- Boulder

Role: PhD Candidate- Musicology

Session Type: Demonstration (Seminar Room, capacity 20)

Topic(s): Digital Texts, Integrating Arts and Technology, Maker and Hacker Culture

Learning objective(s):

Become aware of automation tools built into familiar applications
Understand the advantages of automation, such as efficiency and uniformity
See automation tools in action and begin to imagine applications for these tools in your own teaching/learning/work

Abstract: While many applications have the ability to automate processes, few users take advantage of these time-saving functionalities. Automation often falls into one of three categories: 1) Macros – collecting individual tasks into a single meta-task, 2) Scripting – writing small snippets of code to automate processes, and 3) Styles and Templates – creating preset layouts and formatting systems that are reusable and can be automatically applied to new material.

This talk will show the power of automation to save time and produce a better product – two things of great value to both teachers and students. In order to familiarize participants with the different types of automation, I will demonstrate automation tools in Photoshop, Microsoft Word, and Finale (the industry-standard music notation software).

Bio: Sienna M. Wood is a PhD Candidate in Musicology at the University of Colorado Boulder and holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in music from Colorado College. She earned a Certificate in College Teaching from the Graduate Teacher Program at CU-Boulder in 2014 and is committed to innovative music pedagogy. Her dissertation entitled "Noé Faignient’s Chansons, Madrigales & Motetz à 3 parties: A Young Composer’s Debut in 16th-century Antwerp" will be completed in 2015. Sienna is a freelance web developer and graphic artist and enjoys bringing her technological skills into the service of music research and education.

Description: Automation tools in Photoshop, Microsoft Word, and Finale will be demonstrated in this presentation. The sections on web style sheets and Microsoft Word will be an opportunity for hands-on experience for participants with laptops who wish to follow along.

Kevin Zeiler / Jeff Helton | Times Are a Changin': Moving from Lecture to Experience in the Classroom

Organization: Metropolitan State University of Denver

Role: Assistant Professor- Health Care Management Program

Session Type: General Presentation

Topic(s): Changing Role of Faculty

Learning objective(s):

Discussion of faculty perceptions of their changing role in the contemporary classroom
Review current literature on the changing role of faculty
Presentation of experiential learning examples as a contrast to the didactic lecture of times past

Abstract: Participants will engage in a brief discussion of their impressions of the changing role of faculty in today's classroom and then compare their impressions with ideas from current literature in the field. Given the greater call for experiential learning in many fields today, a review of some examples of newer approaches to experiential learning and their contrast to didactic teaching will be presented, to end with a discussion of ideas to further enrich experiential learning in today's classroom.

Bio: Kevin D. Zeiler, JD, is an assistant professor in the Health Care Management Program at the Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado. Professor Zeiler has 15-plus years of experience working in the health care field, as a paramedic, supervisor and educator. His professional area of interest is in health policy and law. Professor Zeiler holds a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Denver, an MBA from Regis University and a BS in Health Care Management from the Metropolitan State University of Denver.

Jeffrey R. Helton, PhD is an assistant professor in the Health Care Management Program at the Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado. Dr. Helton has over twenty five years of experience in health care management, serving as Chief Financial Officer of health systems nationwide. His research interests are in operational efficiency in health care provider organizations and in the impact of technology on operational efficiency. Dr. Helton has PhD from the University of Texas School of Public Health, an MS in Health Administration from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and a BBA in Health Care Administration from Eastern Kentucky University.

Description: The session will begin with a poll of participants on their impressions of the changing role of faculty in their individual experiences. That input will be used to facilitate a discussion of the changed role of faculty from lecturer to facilitator of practical experiential learning. The outcomes from that discussion will then be contrasted with current literature in the field on the evolving role of faculty and the changing needs of students in contemporary higher education.

After discussion of the changing role of faculty, some examples of experiential learning used in a contemporary health care management program will be presented. This presentation will then be used as the basis for discussion of newer teaching modalities.